May 23, 2012
A Fast Food Burger Is 3 Times Larger Now Than in The 1950s

Research has shown that the bigger your plate, the likelier it is you’ll overeat. The same logic may apply to fast food, where according to a new infographic by the Centers for Disease Control, portion sizes for popular items have increased dramatically since the 1950s.
Read more. [Image: CDC]

A Fast Food Burger Is 3 Times Larger Now Than in The 1950s

Research has shown that the bigger your plate, the likelier it is you’ll overeat. The same logic may apply to fast food, where according to a new infographic by the Centers for Disease Control, portion sizes for popular items have increased dramatically since the 1950s.

Read more. [Image: CDC]

September 26, 2011
azspot:

Deep Poverty on the Rise

azspot:

Deep Poverty on the Rise

(via sunfoundation)

September 20, 2011
sunfoundation:

How do Americans spend their days?

One of my favorite data graphics is an interactive piece by The New York Times that shows how Americans spend their day, based on the American Time  Use Survey (ATUS). I’ve also been wanting to play with Mike Bostock’s Data-Driven Documents, or D3 for short, for a while now. So put the two together, and this is what I got.

sunfoundation:

How do Americans spend their days?

One of my favorite data graphics is an interactive piece by The New York Times that shows how Americans spend their day, based on the American Time Use Survey (ATUS). I’ve also been wanting to play with Mike Bostock’s Data-Driven Documents, or D3 for short, for a while now. So put the two together, and this is what I got.

August 2, 2011
sunfoundation:

 The Go-to Snacks of Literary Greats

I’m not the squealing type, but couldn’t help but let out a delighted squeak at the sight of this illustration of famous writers’ favorite snacks by Wendy MacNaughton for the New York Times. MacNaughton  confesses to munching on garlic croutons as she works, which I can  totally get behind. Personally, I go for Red Vines.

sunfoundation:

The Go-to Snacks of Literary Greats

I’m not the squealing type, but couldn’t help but let out a delighted squeak at the sight of this illustration of famous writers’ favorite snacks by Wendy MacNaughton for the New York Times. MacNaughton confesses to munching on garlic croutons as she works, which I can totally get behind. Personally, I go for Red Vines.

July 13, 2011
sunfoundation:

Clear Congress Project: Visualizing Real-Time Legislative Data

The Clear Congress Project by Thomas Gibes is a real-time visualization  of US Congress data made available through the Sunlight Labs’ Real Time Congress API,  Google News, Twitter, and other data sources. The aim of the project is  to serve as a possible model for facilitating governmental transparency  beyond simple data access by proposing a new format for polical news  distribution.

sunfoundation:

Clear Congress Project: Visualizing Real-Time Legislative Data

The Clear Congress Project by Thomas Gibes is a real-time visualization of US Congress data made available through the Sunlight Labs’ Real Time Congress API, Google News, Twitter, and other data sources. The aim of the project is to serve as a possible model for facilitating governmental transparency beyond simple data access by proposing a new format for polical news distribution.

July 12, 2011
sunfoundation:

Lobbyists’ Honorary Gifts to Federal Officials

Companies and organizations can donate an unlimited amount of money to  honor officials, sponsor their conferences, and donate to their pet  charities, so long as these donations are reported to the Senate. The  Sunlight Foundation analyzed these filings from 2009 and 2010 and found  about $50 million in honorary gifts and meeting costs. These donations  can all be viewed in the interactive display below by company making the  donation or by official being honored.

sunfoundation:

Lobbyists’ Honorary Gifts to Federal Officials

Companies and organizations can donate an unlimited amount of money to honor officials, sponsor their conferences, and donate to their pet charities, so long as these donations are reported to the Senate. The Sunlight Foundation analyzed these filings from 2009 and 2010 and found about $50 million in honorary gifts and meeting costs. These donations can all be viewed in the interactive display below by company making the donation or by official being honored.

June 24, 2011
sunfoundation:

How the World Uses Social Networks
Social networks in every country might live on the same Internet, but  that doesn’t prevent differences in online customs and culture from  developing along geographic borders.
Click here to embiggen

sunfoundation:

How the World Uses Social Networks

Social networks in every country might live on the same Internet, but that doesn’t prevent differences in online customs and culture from developing along geographic borders.

Click here to embiggen

(via soupsoup)

June 16, 2011
sunfoundation:

Life expectancy in the U.S. varies widely by region, in some places is decreasing

Large swaths of the United States are showing decreasing or stagnating life expectancy even as the nation’s overall longevity trend has continued upwards, according to a county-by-county study of life expectancy over two decades.In one-quarter of the country, girls born today may live shorter lives than their mothers, and the country as a whole is falling behind other industrialized nations in the march toward longer life, according to the study.

sunfoundation:

Life expectancy in the U.S. varies widely by region, in some places is decreasing

Large swaths of the United States are showing decreasing or stagnating life expectancy even as the nation’s overall longevity trend has continued upwards, according to a county-by-county study of life expectancy over two decades.In one-quarter of the country, girls born today may live shorter lives than their mothers, and the country as a whole is falling behind other industrialized nations in the march toward longer life, according to the study.

June 7, 2011
nationaljournal:

Money is important, but it isn’t everything.  The Organization for  Economic Cooperation and Development created the Your Better Life Index  to compare the quality of life as well as economic prowess of its 34  member countries. The index measures each country using 11 different  lines, including income, employment, health, education, environmental  quality, and its citizens’ opinions about life satisfaction, work-life  balance, and a sense of community.  Because people have different  priorities, the OECD index allows them to rank countries according to  their own values. The United States remains at the top for income and  wealth, but it lags behind as a place to live a long and happy life.

nationaljournal:

Money is important, but it isn’t everything. The Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development created the Your Better Life Index to compare the quality of life as well as economic prowess of its 34 member countries. The index measures each country using 11 different lines, including income, employment, health, education, environmental quality, and its citizens’ opinions about life satisfaction, work-life balance, and a sense of community. Because people have different priorities, the OECD index allows them to rank countries according to their own values. The United States remains at the top for income and wealth, but it lags behind as a place to live a long and happy life.

(via sunfoundation)

May 18, 2011
sunfoundation:

We’re No. 5 (and dropping)

The city of Philadelphia grew slightly from 2000 to 2010, just enough to stave off Phoenix and retain its claim to being the fifth-largest city in the United States. The Philadelphia metro area wasn’t as lucky.

sunfoundation:

We’re No. 5 (and dropping)

The city of Philadelphia grew slightly from 2000 to 2010, just enough to stave off Phoenix and retain its claim to being the fifth-largest city in the United States. The Philadelphia metro area wasn’t as lucky.

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