March 7, 2014
In Defense of Instagram Selfies from Crimea

The Daily Mail was positively apoplectic. “Shocking pictures show people in Crimea taking SELFIES with Russian masked gunmen as Ukraine teeters on the brink of war,” the British tabloid yelped over the weekend. Did you catch that? SELFIES!
Others were equally astonished. “Welcome to the 21st century, where you take Instagram selfies with the guys invading your country,” a Twitter user marveled.
Putting aside one of the explanations for this stream of selfies—a substantial pro-Moscow, ethnic Russian population on the peninsula—it’s actually quite fitting that amateur and professional photographers are experimenting with new technology this week to document Russia’s occupation of the Ukrainian peninsula. A century and a half ago, Crimea served as the breeding ground for modern war photography.
Read more. [Image: Roger Fenton/anna_yurtaeva]

In Defense of Instagram Selfies from Crimea

The Daily Mail was positively apoplectic. “Shocking pictures show people in Crimea taking SELFIES with Russian masked gunmen as Ukraine teeters on the brink of war,” the British tabloid yelped over the weekend. Did you catch that? SELFIES!

Others were equally astonished. “Welcome to the 21st century, where you take Instagram selfies with the guys invading your country,” a Twitter user marveled.

Putting aside one of the explanations for this stream of selfies—a substantial pro-Moscow, ethnic Russian population on the peninsula—it’s actually quite fitting that amateur and professional photographers are experimenting with new technology this week to document Russia’s occupation of the Ukrainian peninsula. A century and a half ago, Crimea served as the breeding ground for modern war photography.

Read more. [Image: Roger Fenton/anna_yurtaeva]

December 13, 2013
The Most Instagrammed Place in the World Is a Mall in Bangkok

2:40pm
  
Filed under: Technology Instagram Bangkok Tech 
December 12, 2013
Behold, Facetwitterest: The Standardized Future of Social

Much of the content of the World Wide Web, from approximately 1990 to the early 2000s, was communications in and among small groups of people. It was discussion boards and blog communities: stuff that may have been findable, sure, with a targeted Google search, but that was created with the assumption of being seen only by a small number of people. As Clay Shirky summed it up in his 2009 book Here Comes Everybody: “Since we’re so unused to communications media and broadcast media being mixed together, we think that everyone is now broadcasting. This is a mistake.” 
The rise of social networks, however, has made that assumption much less mistaken: For business reasons that are both obvious and less so, they have tended to treat publicness as implicit in our communications. Facebook began as a limited network but expanded into a much more public one, tweaking its privacy features along the way. Twitter tries to merge default (Library of Congress!) and more streamlined access to users’ tweets by its “follow” architecture and DM capabilities. Google+ has tried to expand that streamlining idea further with its “Circles” framework—to, of course, limited success. As a result, the communicative default is much more public than it used to be. Tweets, blog posts, Instagrams: these are easily accessible to a global audience. The World Wide Web, and all that.
Read more. [Image: Integrated Technology]

Behold, Facetwitterest: The Standardized Future of Social

Much of the content of the World Wide Web, from approximately 1990 to the early 2000s, was communications in and among small groups of people. It was discussion boards and blog communities: stuff that may have been findable, sure, with a targeted Google search, but that was created with the assumption of being seen only by a small number of people. As Clay Shirky summed it up in his 2009 book Here Comes Everybody: “Since we’re so unused to communications media and broadcast media being mixed together, we think that everyone is now broadcasting. This is a mistake.” 

The rise of social networks, however, has made that assumption much less mistaken: For business reasons that are both obvious and less so, they have tended to treat publicness as implicit in our communications. Facebook began as a limited network but expanded into a much more public one, tweaking its privacy features along the way. Twitter tries to merge default (Library of Congress!) and more streamlined access to users’ tweets by its “follow” architecture and DM capabilities. Google+ has tried to expand that streamlining idea further with its “Circles” framework—to, of course, limited success. As a result, the communicative default is much more public than it used to be. Tweets, blog posts, Instagrams: these are easily accessible to a global audience. The World Wide Web, and all that.

Read more. [Image: Integrated Technology]

November 27, 2013
The Edible Instagram

I like to think it started like this. “You know what’s wrong with your Instagrams?” said the one. “Um, what?” said the other, her mind scanning the possibilities: poor filter choice, skewed shot-framings, overuse of the #nofilter tag. She was, honestly, a little bit offended. 
She was also unprepared for the answer she got. “You can’t eat them!” he replied. 
Which is … true. Instagrams, for all the things they are, are decidedly not one other thing: edible. And that’s largely because Instagrams are not, strictly speaking, things.
But you know how you could eat your Instagrams? By spray-painting frosting-y versions of them onto the surfaces of marshmallows. Seriously. Think Stickygrams … for your mouth. 
Read more. [Image: Boomf]

The Edible Instagram

I like to think it started like this. “You know what’s wrong with your Instagrams?” said the one. “Um, what?” said the other, her mind scanning the possibilities: poor filter choice, skewed shot-framings, overuse of the #nofilter tag. She was, honestly, a little bit offended. 

She was also unprepared for the answer she got. “You can’t eat them!” he replied. 

Which is … true. Instagrams, for all the things they are, are decidedly not one other thing: edible. And that’s largely because Instagrams are not, strictly speaking, things.

But you know how you could eat your Instagrams? By spray-painting frosting-y versions of them onto the surfaces of marshmallows. Seriously. Think Stickygrams … for your mouth.

Read more. [Image: Boomf]

5:26pm
  
Filed under: Technology Instagram Food 
October 10, 2013
Study: We’ll Enjoy Food More If You Don’t Instagram It

Imagining eating something provides a sense of satiety.
Read more. [Image courtesy Brigham Young University]

Study: We’ll Enjoy Food More If You Don’t Instagram It

Imagining eating something provides a sense of satiety.

Read more. [Image courtesy Brigham Young University]

September 6, 2013
NASA Now Has an Instagram Account

NASA has an Instagram account.
Oh, yes: Now, between pictures of cats, lunches, friends, and your friend’s cat’s lunch, you can view space photography. Today the account has declared a moon theme, and, accordingly, it has posted:
A picture of the moon from the Earth.
A picture of the moon, taken from a space station whizzing around the Earth.
A picture of the Earth from the moon.
Read more. [Image: NASA]

NASA Now Has an Instagram Account

NASA has an Instagram account.

Oh, yes: Now, between pictures of cats, lunches, friends, and your friend’s cat’s lunch, you can view space photography. Today the account has declared a moon theme, and, accordingly, it has posted:

Read more. [Image: NASA]

September 5, 2013
Assad’s Bizarre Instagram Account: Propaganda With a Comments Section

"I belong to the Syrian people," Syrian president Bashar al-Assad told the French journalist George Malbrunot, of the newspaper Le Figaro, earlier this week. “I defend their interests and independence and will not succumb to external pressure.”
Yes. That’s what he said. There are many, many caveats to that little assertion, obviously, but one of the most noteworthy is this: The message wasn’t just sent from President Assad to George Malbrunot. It was also sent from President #Assad to George #Malbrunot. It was a message that originated in person, ostensibly, but that was delivered to the world (or at least to 36,664 members of that world) with the help of a Facebook-owned social network. It was political posturing in the form of an Instagram. 
In that capacity, the “Syria, c’est moi” messaging accompanied a picture of Assad doing his thing, or claiming to — one of dozens of such pictures that syrianpresidency, “the official Instagram account for the Presidency of the Syrian Arab Republic,”  has posted to its page since July.
Read more.

Assad’s Bizarre Instagram Account: Propaganda With a Comments Section

"I belong to the Syrian people," Syrian president Bashar al-Assad told the French journalist George Malbrunot, of the newspaper Le Figaro, earlier this week. “I defend their interests and independence and will not succumb to external pressure.”

Yes. That’s what he said. There are many, many caveats to that little assertion, obviously, but one of the most noteworthy is this: The message wasn’t just sent from President Assad to George Malbrunot. It was also sent from President #Assad to George #Malbrunot. It was a message that originated in person, ostensibly, but that was delivered to the world (or at least to 36,664 members of that world) with the help of a Facebook-owned social network. It was political posturing in the form of an Instagram. 

In that capacity, the “Syria, c’est moi” messaging accompanied a picture of Assad doing his thing, or claiming to — one of dozens of such pictures that syrianpresidency, “the official Instagram account for the Presidency of the Syrian Arab Republic,”  has posted to its page since July.

Read more.

September 4, 2013
Today in Instagram: Errol Morris and Werner Herzog Hug Under a Rainbow

August 12, 2013
How to Create a Fake Girlfriend on Instagram, in 8 Easy Steps

August 9, 2013
The Grand New Visualization That Represents Some (Not All) of the Web

We can represent the massive scale of the web’s companies, but not their interconnections.
Read more. [Image: Designly.com]

The Grand New Visualization That Represents Some (Not All) of the Web

We can represent the massive scale of the web’s companies, but not their interconnections.

Read more. [Image: Designly.com]

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