April 17, 2014
Our May issue is now online! Stay tuned for some of the articles from it throughout the rest of the week.

Our May issue is now online! Stay tuned for some of the articles from it throughout the rest of the week.

April 16, 2014
Exposing the NSA: A Public Service Worthy of a Pulitzer

Earlier this week, journalism’s most prestigious award, the Pulitzer Prize for public serice, was given to two newspapers for their exposés of mass surveillance by the U.S. government. The award citation praised the Washington Post for “its revelation of widespread secret surveillance by the National Security Agency, marked by authoritative and insightful reports that helped the public understand how the disclosures fit into the larger framework of national security.” The Guardian was recognized for “aggressive reporting” that helped “to spark a debate about the relationship between the government and the public over issues of security and privacy.”
Edward Snowden, who supplied the leaked documents that enabled the reporting, characterized the award as “a vindication for everyone who believes that the public has a role in government,” and praised “the efforts of the brave reporters and their colleagues who kept working in the face of extraordinary intimidation, including the forced destruction of journalistic materials, the inappropriate use of terrorism laws, and so many other means of pressure to get them to stop.”
NSA apologists spoke out too.
Read more. [Image: Reuters]

Exposing the NSA: A Public Service Worthy of a Pulitzer

Earlier this week, journalism’s most prestigious award, the Pulitzer Prize for public serice, was given to two newspapers for their exposés of mass surveillance by the U.S. government. The award citation praised the Washington Post for “its revelation of widespread secret surveillance by the National Security Agency, marked by authoritative and insightful reports that helped the public understand how the disclosures fit into the larger framework of national security.” The Guardian was recognized for “aggressive reporting” that helped “to spark a debate about the relationship between the government and the public over issues of security and privacy.”

Edward Snowden, who supplied the leaked documents that enabled the reporting, characterized the award as “a vindication for everyone who believes that the public has a role in government,” and praised “the efforts of the brave reporters and their colleagues who kept working in the face of extraordinary intimidation, including the forced destruction of journalistic materials, the inappropriate use of terrorism laws, and so many other means of pressure to get them to stop.”

NSA apologists spoke out too.

Read more. [Image: Reuters]

April 11, 2014

Our April issue will be online next week, but here’s a sneak peek of what’s inside. Which story do you want to read first?

(Source: youtube.com)

11:07am
  
Filed under: Journalism Magazines 
April 4, 2014
Want to work for The Atlantic?

March 20, 2014
Our new issue is out now! Stay tuned throughout the day for some excerpts from the magazine.

Our new issue is out now! Stay tuned throughout the day for some excerpts from the magazine.

February 20, 2014
The Dark Power of Fraternities

A yearlong investigation of Greek houses reveals their endemic, lurid, and sometimes tragic problems—and a sophisticated system for shifting the blame.
Read more. [Image: Phil Toledano]

The Dark Power of Fraternities

A yearlong investigation of Greek houses reveals their endemic, lurid, and sometimes tragic problems—and a sophisticated system for shifting the blame.

Read more. [Image: Phil Toledano]

February 20, 2014
Our new issue is out now! Pick up a copy, read some of the articles on our site, or stay tuned throughout the day for excerpts on our Tumblr.

Our new issue is out now! Pick up a copy, read some of the articles on our site, or stay tuned throughout the day for excerpts on our Tumblr.

February 19, 2014
NBC's Bode Miller Interview: Good Reporting Can Be Hard to Watch

February 13, 2014
The United States Just Finished 46th in a Press-Freedom Contest

Every year, Reporters Without Borders ranks 180 countries in order of how well they safeguard press freedom. This year, the United States suffered a precipitous drop.
The latest Press Freedom Index ranked the U.S. 46th. 
That puts us around the same place as UC Santa Barbara in the U.S. News and World Report college rankings. If we were on the PGA tour we’d be Jonas Blixt of Sweden. 
If we were on American Idol we’d have been sent home already.
Read more. [Image: eliszeba/Flickr]

The United States Just Finished 46th in a Press-Freedom Contest

Every year, Reporters Without Borders ranks 180 countries in order of how well they safeguard press freedom. This year, the United States suffered a precipitous drop.

The latest Press Freedom Index ranked the U.S. 46th. 

That puts us around the same place as UC Santa Barbara in the U.S. News and World Report college rankings. If we were on the PGA tour we’d be Jonas Blixt of Sweden. 

If we were on American Idol we’d have been sent home already.

Read more. [Image: eliszeba/Flickr]

February 6, 2014
Like It Or Not, Glenn Greenwald Is Now the Face of the 1st Amendment

Among the dozens of reporters, editors, and commentators who have worked on articles sourced to Edward Snowden, just one, Glenn Greenwald, has been subject to a sustained campaign that seeks to define him as something other than a journalist. NBC’s David Gregory asked him why he shouldn’t be prosecuted for aiding and abetting a felon. Representative Peter King declared that “legal action should be taken against him.” Representative Mike Rogers charges that he is a thief who sells stolen material. The New Republic published a piece alleging that he has a nefarious, secret agenda. Why this unique effort to discredit him in particular?
Countless American journalists have published classified documents in the modern era. All were paid for their work, and in a world with Bob Woodward, it’s unlikely that Greenwald has been paid the most for revelations of classified material. Greenwald isn’t even unique in writing about secrets stolen by Snowden, or in being paid as a freelancer for his work upon the publication of those articles. Nor has Greenwald authored the Snowden articles denounced most bitterly by the national-security establishment. That distinction goes to the talented Barton Gellman.  
So what is different about Greenwald? 
Read more. [Image: Reuters]

Like It Or Not, Glenn Greenwald Is Now the Face of the 1st Amendment

Among the dozens of reporters, editors, and commentators who have worked on articles sourced to Edward Snowden, just one, Glenn Greenwald, has been subject to a sustained campaign that seeks to define him as something other than a journalist. NBC’s David Gregory asked him why he shouldn’t be prosecuted for aiding and abetting a felon. Representative Peter King declared that “legal action should be taken against him.” Representative Mike Rogers charges that he is a thief who sells stolen material. The New Republic published a piece alleging that he has a nefarious, secret agenda. Why this unique effort to discredit him in particular?

Countless American journalists have published classified documents in the modern era. All were paid for their work, and in a world with Bob Woodward, it’s unlikely that Greenwald has been paid the most for revelations of classified material. Greenwald isn’t even unique in writing about secrets stolen by Snowden, or in being paid as a freelancer for his work upon the publication of those articles. Nor has Greenwald authored the Snowden articles denounced most bitterly by the national-security establishment. That distinction goes to the talented Barton Gellman.  

So what is different about Greenwald?

Read more. [Image: Reuters]

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