August 15, 2013
The Atlantic’s September issue is out now. It features articles on how to think about drones, killers on Craigslist, the risks of being a workaholic, the courage of The Clash, and more. Be sure to follow the Tumblr today for highlights from the magazine, plus all of our daily new content.

The Atlantic’s September issue is out now. It features articles on how to think about drones, killers on Craigslist, the risks of being a workaholic, the courage of The Clash, and more. Be sure to follow the Tumblr today for highlights from the magazine, plus all of our daily new content.

9:23am
  
Filed under: The Atlantic Magazine 
November 29, 2012
The Bookstore Strikes Back

Two years ago, when Nashville lost its only in-town bookstores, the novelist Ann Patchett decided to step into the breach. Parnassus Books, which Patchett and two veteran booksellers envisioned, designed, financed, and manage, is now open for business and enjoying the ride.

Read more. [Image: Heidi Ross]

The Bookstore Strikes Back

Two years ago, when Nashville lost its only in-town bookstores, the novelist Ann Patchett decided to step into the breach. Parnassus Books, which Patchett and two veteran booksellers envisioned, designed, financed, and manage, is now open for business and enjoying the ride.

Read more. [Image: Heidi Ross]

May 24, 2012
In the June issue of The Atlantic: David H. Freedman on the return of B.F. Skinner’s ‘creepy’ science of behavior modification, Robert D. Kaplan on Vietnam’s place in U.S.-China relations, a profile of Olympic women’s boxer Marlen Esparza, new fiction by Molly Patterson, and more.
Check out the full Table of Contents and let us know what you think!

In the June issue of The Atlantic: David H. Freedman on the return of B.F. Skinner’s ‘creepy’ science of behavior modification, Robert D. Kaplan on Vietnam’s place in U.S.-China relations, a profile of Olympic women’s boxer Marlen Esparzanew fiction by Molly Patterson, and more.

Check out the full Table of Contents and let us know what you think!

April 12, 2012
In the May issue of The Atlantic: How Facebook may be making us lonely, a profile of iconoclast video-game designer Jonathan Blow, a frugal economist searches for the perfect lunch, the genius of Kanye West, the filthy moralism of Louis CK, and more. 
Check out the issue online and let us know what you think: 

In the May issue of The Atlantic: How Facebook may be making us lonely, a profile of iconoclast video-game designer Jonathan Blow, a frugal economist searches for the perfect lunch, the genius of Kanye West, the filthy moralism of Louis CK, and more. 

Check out the issue online and let us know what you think

February 9, 2012
In our March issue: James Fallows takes measure of President Obama, Raymond Bonner chronicles an unlikely battle against the death penalty, the last review of Christopher Hitchens, and more. Read the whole issue at The Atlantic

In our March issue: James Fallows takes measure of President Obama, Raymond Bonner chronicles an unlikely battle against the death penalty, the last review of Christopher Hitchens, and more. Read the whole issue at The Atlantic

August 9, 2011
In the September issue of The Atlantic: Saving the middle class, the secret history of gun rights in America, Rhett Miller’s 9/11 diary, new fiction by Amy Waldman , and more. Give it a read and let us know what you think!

In the September issue of The AtlanticSaving the middle class, the secret history of gun rights in America, Rhett Miller’s 9/11 diary, new fiction by Amy Waldman , and more. Give it a read and let us know what you think!

July 25, 2011
Our 2011 Fiction issue is online! Read contributions by Ariel Dorfman, Stuart Dybek, Austin Bunn, and others at The Atlantic.

Our 2011 Fiction issue is online! Read contributions by Ariel Dorfman, Stuart Dybek, Austin Bunn, and others at The Atlantic.

June 14, 2011
Libyan Rebels: A Sound Track
Xan Rice reports on the strange relationship between Libya’s rebels and Pink Floyd

Many men have psyched themselves up for war by listening to rock and roll or heavy metal. But how many have sung Pink Floyd’s “Mother” within earshot of the enemy in the dead of night? “When it got really quiet, we’d play guitar and sing ‘Mother, do you think they’ll drop the bomb?’” said Abdulfatah Shaka, 22, his rocket-propelled-grenade launcher at his side. “The snipers would get furious and start shooting everywhere.”
It was the last week of April in the Libyan city of Misurata, the scene of the most-intense battles of the revolution. This is an old-fashioned, urban war: nonsurgical and hugely bloody. Muammar Qaddafi has deployed tanks, multi-barreled rocket launchers, snipers, foot soldiers, and foreign mercenaries. Facing them are civilians with light weapons, Mad Max–style pickup trucks, and, in the case of Shaka and the dozen or so merry young men he leads, a zest for rock music.

Read more at The Atlantic
[Christophe Simon/AFP/Getty Images]

Libyan Rebels: A Sound Track

Xan Rice reports on the strange relationship between Libya’s rebels and Pink Floyd

Many men have psyched themselves up for war by listening to rock and roll or heavy metal. But how many have sung Pink Floyd’s “Mother” within earshot of the enemy in the dead of night? “When it got really quiet, we’d play guitar and sing ‘Mother, do you think they’ll drop the bomb?’” said Abdulfatah Shaka, 22, his rocket-propelled-grenade launcher at his side. “The snipers would get furious and start shooting everywhere.”

It was the last week of April in the Libyan city of Misurata, the scene of the most-intense battles of the revolution. This is an old-fashioned, urban war: nonsurgical and hugely bloody. Muammar Qaddafi has deployed tanks, multi-barreled rocket launchers, snipers, foot soldiers, and foreign mercenaries. Facing them are civilians with light weapons, Mad Max–style pickup trucks, and, in the case of Shaka and the dozen or so merry young men he leads, a zest for rock music.

Read more at The Atlantic

[Christophe Simon/AFP/Getty Images]

June 14, 2011
In the July/August issue of The Atlantic: How the cult of self-esteem is ruining our kids, the case for new-age medicine, and insiders guide to turning Democrats and Republicans into Americans, and more.
Plus: the 14 biggest ideas of the year, along with our Ideas Special Report.
Give it a read and let us know what you think!

In the July/August issue of The Atlantic: How the cult of self-esteem is ruining our kids, the case for new-age medicine, and insiders guide to turning Democrats and Republicans into Americans, and more.

Plus: the 14 biggest ideas of the year, along with our Ideas Special Report.

Give it a read and let us know what you think!

May 26, 2011
babylonfalling:

Cover illustration by Peter Palombi / photographed by Jim Miller.
“This book is my fiftieth birthday present to myself. I feel as though I am crossing the spine of a pitched roof—having ascended one slope. I am programmed at fifty to perform childishly—to insult “The Star-Spangled Banner,” to scrawl pictures of a Nazi flag and an asshole and a lot of other things with a felt-tipped pen…” – Kurt Vonnegut, Jr.

Anyone case to join us for a big bowl of Vonnegut?

babylonfalling:

Cover illustration by Peter Palombi / photographed by Jim Miller.

“This book is my fiftieth birthday present to myself. I feel as though I am crossing the spine of a pitched roof—having ascended one slope. I am programmed at fifty to perform childishly—to insult “The Star-Spangled Banner,” to scrawl pictures of a Nazi flag and an asshole and a lot of other things with a felt-tipped pen…” – Kurt Vonnegut, Jr.

Anyone case to join us for a big bowl of Vonnegut?

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