September 19, 2013

Mark Zuckerberg, Regular Dude

September 19, 2013
Mark Zuckerberg’s Advice to the NSA: Communicate

Last week, Facebook sued the government. ”We are joining others in the industry,” Facebook General Counsel Colin Stretch wrote in a post on the company’s website, “in petitioning the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court to require the government to permit companies to disclose more information about the volume and types of national security-related orders they receive.” So why did a suit like that come in early September, several months after the initial revelations of the NSA’s dealings with tech giants and their data? Because there’d been a breakdown, it seems, of communication. “In recent weeks,” Stretch wrote, “it has become clear that the dialogue with the U.S. government that produced some additional transparency at the outset is at this point unlikely to result in more progress.”
In a conversation this afternoon with Atlantic editor-in-chief James Bennet, Zuckerberg elaborated on the suit. And he elaborated, too, on a comment he made last week: that “the government blew it" — particularly when it came to communicating about the revealed PRISM program to the public. “Some of the government’s statements have been particularly unhelpful,” Zuckerberg told Bennet. “Like, oh, we only spy on non-Americans.” (Facebook, of course, is a global brand.)
But the broader problem, as the CEO explained it, is the NSA’s continued obfuscation of its programs, even after their revelation into the public mind and the public conversation. The government did a bad job, essentially, of explaining itself to an indignant user base. ”The more transparency and communication that the government can do about how they’re requesting data from us,” Zuckerberg said, “the better everyone  would feel about it. Not only because I believe in transparency, but also because it would be in their interest in terms of resolving this on the Facebook side.”
Read more. [Image: Reuters]

Mark Zuckerberg’s Advice to the NSA: Communicate

Last week, Facebook sued the government. ”We are joining others in the industry,” Facebook General Counsel Colin Stretch wrote in a post on the company’s website, “in petitioning the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court to require the government to permit companies to disclose more information about the volume and types of national security-related orders they receive.” So why did a suit like that come in early September, several months after the initial revelations of the NSA’s dealings with tech giants and their data? Because there’d been a breakdown, it seems, of communication. “In recent weeks,” Stretch wrote, “it has become clear that the dialogue with the U.S. government that produced some additional transparency at the outset is at this point unlikely to result in more progress.”

In a conversation this afternoon with Atlantic editor-in-chief James Bennet, Zuckerberg elaborated on the suit. And he elaborated, too, on a comment he made last week: that “the government blew it" — particularly when it came to communicating about the revealed PRISM program to the public. “Some of the government’s statements have been particularly unhelpful,” Zuckerberg told Bennet. “Like, oh, we only spy on non-Americans.” (Facebook, of course, is a global brand.)

But the broader problem, as the CEO explained it, is the NSA’s continued obfuscation of its programs, even after their revelation into the public mind and the public conversation. The government did a bad job, essentially, of explaining itself to an indignant user base. ”The more transparency and communication that the government can do about how they’re requesting data from us,” Zuckerberg said, “the better everyone would feel about it. Not only because I believe in transparency, but also because it would be in their interest in terms of resolving this on the Facebook side.”

Read more. [Image: Reuters]

September 18, 2013
Mark Zuckerberg: Neither Republican, Democrat, Nor Cool

In a conversation in Washington today, Mark Zuckerberg said he thinks of Facebook as a utility for its 1.1 billion worldwide users — the electric company of the 21st century. “I want to produce something that’s a fundamental service for the world,” he said.
In a wide-ranging conversation with Atlantic Editor in Chief James Bennet at the Newseum on Wednesday, the Facebook CEO talked about immigration, the National Security Agency, and how uncool he actually is.
Read more. [Image: Robert Galbraith/Reuters]

Mark Zuckerberg: Neither Republican, Democrat, Nor Cool

In a conversation in Washington today, Mark Zuckerberg said he thinks of Facebook as a utility for its 1.1 billion worldwide users — the electric company of the 21st century. “I want to produce something that’s a fundamental service for the world,” he said.

In a wide-ranging conversation with Atlantic Editor in Chief James Bennet at the Newseum on Wednesday, the Facebook CEO talked about immigration, the National Security Agency, and how uncool he actually is.

Read more. [Image: Robert Galbraith/Reuters]

September 18, 2013
What Can Washington Do For Mark Zuckerberg?

When Mark Zuckerberg talks with Atlantic editor in chief James Bennet in an interview at the Newseum in Washington on Wednesday, he’ll be speaking as a newly minted D.C. insider. Earlier this year, he co-founded the lobbying organization, FWD.us, dedicated to promoting “policies to keep the United States and its citizens competitive in a global economy.” So far, that has mostly meant immigration reform, although the group’s stated goals also include improving STEM education and increasing the funding available for scientific research. The organization has retained at least two D.C. lobbying firms and run ad campaigns for Republican senators who needed political cover at home so they could cooperate in bipartisan immigration reform in Washington. In doing so, Zuckerberg is positioning himself as a leader on these issues, using as leverage Silicon Valley’s cash, his own celebrity, and a long list of tech notables who have backed FWD.us.
Until recently, Zuckerberg has avoided a public role in politics and policy. But this week’s D.C. blitz is evidence that he has embraced his power to influence public affairs. On Thursday, he will meet with top congressional Republicans and Democrats, including House Speaker John Boehner, House Majority Leader Eric Cantor, and House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi. The group is slated to discuss immigration reform; over the summer, the Senate passed immigration legislation that would create more work visas for future immigrants, an initiative Zuckerberg and his Silicon Valley allies had been pushing. Prospects for passage in the House have dimmed, but Zuckerberg is clearly trying to keep the issue alive. 
Read more. [Image: Robert Galbraith/Reuters]

What Can Washington Do For Mark Zuckerberg?

When Mark Zuckerberg talks with Atlantic editor in chief James Bennet in an interview at the Newseum in Washington on Wednesday, he’ll be speaking as a newly minted D.C. insider. Earlier this year, he co-founded the lobbying organization, FWD.us, dedicated to promoting “policies to keep the United States and its citizens competitive in a global economy.” So far, that has mostly meant immigration reform, although the group’s stated goals also include improving STEM education and increasing the funding available for scientific research. The organization has retained at least two D.C. lobbying firms and run ad campaigns for Republican senators who needed political cover at home so they could cooperate in bipartisan immigration reform in Washington. In doing so, Zuckerberg is positioning himself as a leader on these issues, using as leverage Silicon Valley’s cash, his own celebrity, and a long list of tech notables who have backed FWD.us.

Until recently, Zuckerberg has avoided a public role in politics and policy. But this week’s D.C. blitz is evidence that he has embraced his power to influence public affairs. On Thursday, he will meet with top congressional Republicans and Democrats, including House Speaker John Boehner, House Majority Leader Eric Cantor, and House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi. The group is slated to discuss immigration reform; over the summer, the Senate passed immigration legislation that would create more work visas for future immigrants, an initiative Zuckerberg and his Silicon Valley allies had been pushing. Prospects for passage in the House have dimmed, but Zuckerberg is clearly trying to keep the issue alive.

Read more. [Image: Robert Galbraith/Reuters]

September 18, 2013
Watch Mark Zuckerberg talk with Atlantic editor in chief James Bennet

Today at 3:45 pm EDT, Atlantic editor in Chief James Bennet willinterview Mark Zuckerberg, the founder and CEO of Facebook, at the Newseum in Washington, D.C. For viewers at home, the interview will be livestreamed here. Full editorial coverage will be available on The Atlantic's Events Channel, and the conversation will be covered on social media using @TheAtlantic, @AtlanticLive, and #AtlanticLive.

September 10, 2013
Universities Are Trying to Stop the Next Mark Zuckerberg From Dropping Out

August 23, 2013
Spreading Literacy, Spreading Internet

On Wednesday, Facebook announced that it, along with a coalition of several mobile technology companies, was launching Internet.org, an organization aiming to dramatically increase Internet access to “the two-thirds of the world who are not yet connected.”
For those familiar with Mark Zuckerberg’s mission for Facebook, this new enterprise is a natural extension of his goal to “make the world more open and connected.”
Read more. [Image: Reuters]

Spreading Literacy, Spreading Internet

On Wednesday, Facebook announced that it, along with a coalition of several mobile technology companies, was launching Internet.org, an organization aiming to dramatically increase Internet access to “the two-thirds of the world who are not yet connected.”

For those familiar with Mark Zuckerberg’s mission for Facebook, this new enterprise is a natural extension of his goal to “make the world more open and connected.”

Read more. [Image: Reuters]

May 23, 2012
The Sorry Six-Day History of Facebook, Inc: A Glitch, a Snitch, and a Tumble

It wasn’t bad enough for Facebook to see its stock cascade by 18% — or seven points — since its delayed and disappointing Friday IPO. No, the real story lurks behind the numbers: the disastrous performance of the overwhelmed stock exchange and new rumors that Facebook might have broken the law before its first minute as a public company by leaking exclusive news about its earnings to large banks, who then went ahead and told big investors to sell Facebook at the opening.
Read more. [Image: Reuters]

The Sorry Six-Day History of Facebook, Inc: A Glitch, a Snitch, and a Tumble

It wasn’t bad enough for Facebook to see its stock cascade by 18%  or seven points  since its delayed and disappointing Friday IPO. No, the real story lurks behind the numbers: the disastrous performance of the overwhelmed stock exchange and new rumors that Facebook might have broken the law before its first minute as a public company by leaking exclusive news about its earnings to large banks, who then went ahead and told big investors to sell Facebook at the opening.

Read more. [Image: Reuters]

May 18, 2012
The greatest humblebrag of all time.

The greatest humblebrag of all time.

April 9, 2012
What Mark Zuckerberg Could’ve Bought With $1 Billion
Instagram 
The entire New York Times, says Reuters’ Jack Shafer
The ability to buy out New York Times CEO Janet Robinson 42 times
800 of AOL’s Microsoft’s patents
Roughly 1,250 GSA West Coast Conferences
Shell’s Debt on Iranian Oil
The cure for Lou Gehrig’s disease
Solo Cups (the company) 
The amount BP has pledged toward Gulf Restoration
A better 911 program in New York City
Soccer team Real Madrid’s Island in the UAE
The winnings of every Powerball jackpot in 2007
45% of a B-2 Bomber
68 Lebron Jameses , 40 Kobe Bryants, and 83 Albert Pujolses
All of J.Lo’s love (it’s gratis!)

What Mark Zuckerberg Could’ve Bought With $1 Billion

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