September 25, 2013
How New York City Turned into Michael Bloomberg’s Test Tube

In one month, New York City voters will pick a new mayor. On the left, Bill de Blasio has campaigned as the anti-Bloomberg, promising to change current policies on schools and policing. On the right, Joe Lhota has alternately praised and criticized the current mayor, expressing support of certain policies while at the same time trying to distance himself from the current administration’s middling approval rates. No matter who gets elected, New York’s next mayor will run a city that has changed a lot in the last 12 years. While Michael Bloomberg’s successor might be able to rewrite certain policies, many of the mayor’s efforts will have a lasting effect on the city.
But there are higher stakes for Bloomberg’s legacy beyond the five boroughs. Looking ahead to CityLab, The Atlantic’s summit on local-level innovation to be held in New York City from October 6-8, it seems important to ask whether this is even possible: Can one city’s experiments affect the way cities are run across the world?* A growing number of scholars and theorists seem to think so.
In fact, Bloomberg’s effort to expand the power of cities may be his most lasting legacy.
Read more. [Image: Reuters]

How New York City Turned into Michael Bloomberg’s Test Tube

In one month, New York City voters will pick a new mayor. On the left, Bill de Blasio has campaigned as the anti-Bloomberg, promising to change current policies on schools and policing. On the right, Joe Lhota has alternately praised and criticized the current mayor, expressing support of certain policies while at the same time trying to distance himself from the current administration’s middling approval rates. No matter who gets elected, New York’s next mayor will run a city that has changed a lot in the last 12 years. While Michael Bloomberg’s successor might be able to rewrite certain policies, many of the mayor’s efforts will have a lasting effect on the city.

But there are higher stakes for Bloomberg’s legacy beyond the five boroughs. Looking ahead to CityLab, The Atlantic’s summit on local-level innovation to be held in New York City from October 6-8, it seems important to ask whether this is even possible: Can one city’s experiments affect the way cities are run across the world?* A growing number of scholars and theorists seem to think so.

In fact, Bloomberg’s effort to expand the power of cities may be his most lasting legacy.

Read more. [Image: Reuters]

September 9, 2013
"[…] there is no empirical proof that stop and frisk is responsible for New York’s drop in crime. But this does not stop Bloomberg from claiming it anyway, then fuming because “nobody” is talking about crime in minority neighborhoods. In fact, minorities have been talking about since the days of “Self-Destruction” (the song is literally called “Self-Destruction.”) Disagree? By Bloomberg’s lights you are a “racist” who’s attempting to divide the city."

Ta-Nehisi Coates, discussing Michael Bloomberg and his political views.

July 15, 2013
'Systematic Humiliation' of Minorities Doesn't Rule Out a Glowing <i>NYT</i> Profile

December 14, 2012
"Not even kindergarteners learning their A,B,Cs are safe. We heard after Columbine that it was too soon to talk about gun laws. We heard it after Virginia Tech. After Tucson and Aurora and Oak Creek. And now we are hearing it again. For every day we wait, 34 more people are murdered with guns. Today, many of them were five-year olds. President Obama rightly sent his heartfelt condolences to the families in Newtown. But the country needs him to send a bill to Congress to fix this problem. Calling for ‘meaningful action’ is not enough. We need immediate action."

Mayor Michael Bloomberg

October 25, 2012
For the first time in the history of the world, this year, more people will die from the effects of too much food than from starvation.

iliketodothings:

New York’s Mayor on Everything From Campaign Money to Circumcision

An excellent interview.

June 1, 2012
"Just before you die, remember you got three extra years."

New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg, defending his proposed soda ban.

June 1, 2012
A Modest Proposal: New York Should Outlaw Bloomberg Terminals

Look at Mayor Michael Bloomberg, standing behind a podium, as he so often does in his job. It&#8217;s in that upright posture that he&#8217;s spoken about bans on smoking, trans-fats, and now large containers of sweetened liquid. Perhaps it is all an elaborate attempt to distract us from something even less healthy. For elsewhere in New York, countless workers toil at the machine that helped their namesake become a billionaire &#8212; the Bloomberg terminal, ubiquitous in finance. And get this: almost all of them are sitting down. Yes, they are seated.And &#8220;over a lifetime, the unhealthful effects of sitting add up,&#8221; The New York Times Magazine reported last April in a story titled, &#8220;Is Sitting a Lethal Activity.&#8221; [&#8230;]
Read more. [Image: Reuters]

A Modest Proposal: New York Should Outlaw Bloomberg Terminals

Look at Mayor Michael Bloomberg, standing behind a podium, as he so often does in his job. It’s in that upright posture that he’s spoken about bans on smoking, trans-fats, and now large containers of sweetened liquid. Perhaps it is all an elaborate attempt to distract us from something even less healthy. For elsewhere in New York, countless workers toil at the machine that helped their namesake become a billionaire — the Bloomberg terminal, ubiquitous in finance. And get this: almost all of them are sitting down. 

Yes, they are seated.

And “over a lifetime, the unhealthful effects of sitting add up,” The New York Times Magazine reported last April in a story titled, “Is Sitting a Lethal Activity.” […]

Read more. [Image: Reuters]

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