December 24, 2013
How Astronauts Nearly Missed Taking the Iconic Earthrise Photo on Christmas Eve, 1968

Forty-five years ago today, Christmas Eve 1968, astronauts Frank Borman, James Lovell, and William Anders saw something no human had ever seen before—our planet as it appeared to rise over the moon’s horizon.
Read more. [Image: NASA]

How Astronauts Nearly Missed Taking the Iconic Earthrise Photo on Christmas Eve, 1968

Forty-five years ago today, Christmas Eve 1968, astronauts Frank Borman, James Lovell, and William Anders saw something no human had ever seen before—our planet as it appeared to rise over the moon’s horizon.

Read more. [Image: NASA]

January 23, 2013

When We Blew Up Arizona to Simulate the Moon

Thanks to a well-timed tip from landscape blogger Alex Trevi of PrunedVenue made a detour on our exit out of Flagstaff, Arizona, to visit the old black cinder fields of an extinct volcano—where, incredibly, NASA and its Apollo astronauts once practiced their, at the time, forthcoming landing on the moon.

Read more. [Image: Venue]

3:58pm
  
Filed under: Moon Astronomy Science technology 
January 10, 2013

theatlanticvideo:

The Perfect Shot: A Man, a Moon, and a Thin Piece of Rope

Moonwalk by Bryan Smith is part of a National Geographic Channel series called The Man Who Can Fly. This particular scene features Dean Potter, a record-breaking climber who lives in Yosemite, walking on a highline between two enormous granite rocks. 

December 10, 2012
NASA Decided to X-Ray the Moon. This is What They Saw.
[Image: NASA/JPL-Caltech/MIT/GSFC]

NASA Decided to X-Ray the Moon. This is What They Saw.

[Image: NASA/JPL-Caltech/MIT/GSFC]

5:16pm
  
Filed under: Science NASA Moon Technology Space 
September 12, 2012
Moondoggle: The Forgotten Opposition to the Apollo Program

Polls both by USA Today and Gallup have shown support for the moon landing has increased the farther we’ve gotten away from it. 77 percent of people in 1989 thought the moon landing was worth it; only 47 percent felt that way in 1979. 
When Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin landed on the moon, a process began that has all but eradicated any reference to the substantial opposition by scientists, scholars, and regular old people to spending money on sending humans to the moon. Part jobs program, part science cash cow, the American space program in the 1960s placed the funding halo of military action on the heads of civilians. It bent the whole research apparatus of the United States to a symbolic goal in the Cold War[…]
Given this outlay during the 1960s, a time of great social unrest, you can bet people protested spending this much money on a moon landing. Many more quietly opposed the missions. 

Read more.

Moondoggle: The Forgotten Opposition to the Apollo Program

Polls both by USA Today and Gallup have shown support for the moon landing has increased the farther we’ve gotten away from it. 77 percent of people in 1989 thought the moon landing was worth it; only 47 percent felt that way in 1979. 

When Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin landed on the moon, a process began that has all but eradicated any reference to the substantial opposition by scientists, scholars, and regular old people to spending money on sending humans to the moon. Part jobs program, part science cash cow, the American space program in the 1960s placed the funding halo of military action on the heads of civilians. It bent the whole research apparatus of the United States to a symbolic goal in the Cold War[…]

Given this outlay during the 1960s, a time of great social unrest, you can bet people protested spending this much money on a moon landing. Many more quietly opposed the missions. 

Read more.

4:02pm
  
Filed under: Keneddy Charts Moon Space Money U.S. polls 
September 12, 2012

theatlanticvideo:

On Its 50th Anniversary, Watch JFK’s ‘We Choose to Go to the Moon’ Speech

On September 12, 1962, President Kennedy made an inspiring case for space exploration and putting a man on the moon by the end of the decade. Speaking at Rice University, where he was an honorary visiting professor, Kennedy explained, “I regard the decision last year to shift our efforts in space from low to high gear as among the most important decisions that will be made during my incumbency in the office of the Presidency. ” Indeed, the U.S. tripled the budget for space exploration between 1961 and 1962, and on July 20, 1969, Apollo 11 made history.

12:27pm
  
Filed under: Video Space technology History JFK Moon 
August 27, 2012

theatlanticvideo:

NASA’s Restored Footage of Neil Armstrong’s First Steps on the Moon

As the world mourns the loss of Neil Armstrong, the first man on the moon, it’s worth taking a moment to revisit the iconic Apollo 11 landing. Armstrong’s first steps on the moon were broadcast live to an audience of millions, but it wasn’t until 2009 that NASA restored the grainy footage, releasing it online more recently as a short tribute montage, below. Read more about how the Apollo 11 team televised the historic moment in “1 Small Step for a Cam: How Astronauts Shot Video of the Moon Landing.” 

1:55pm
  
Filed under: NASA Neil Armstrong Moon Science Video 
August 26, 2012
"I put up my thumb and shut one eye, and my thumb blotted out the planet Earth. I didn’t feel like a giant. I felt very, very small." —Neil Armstrong

"I put up my thumb and shut one eye, and my thumb blotted out the planet Earth. I didn’t feel like a giant. I felt very, very small." —Neil Armstrong

August 25, 2012
The Heartstopping Tale of How Apollo 11 Almost Failed to Return From The Moon

The date is July 20, 1969. With minutes of fuel to spare, the astronauts of Apollo 11 are gliding across the surface of the moon, looking for a place to land. There’s just one problem: boulders strewn across the landscape prevent a quick touchdown.
Back in Houston, mission control is issuing periodic readouts of the spacecraft’s fuel status. The seconds tick by until Apollo 11 is running on fumes. The situation is urgent. If the astronauts can’t land, they’ll be stranded on the moon until they die, with millions following the broadcast live from earth.
As the astronauts frantically search for a landing zone, the health monitoring equipment linked to the men goes haywire. The chart you see above shows Buzz Aldrin’s EKG readout in the final moments before touchdown, which is marked by the long vertical line about three-fourths of the way through the graph. It’s a rare, alternative glimpse of a critical moment in history, preserved by TEDMED curator and Priceline.com founder Jay Walker in a vast library devoted to science, medicine, and history.
As we know, the astronauts landed safely and returned home. But for a few heartstopping seconds, anything could have happened — and this chart tells the tale.

The Heartstopping Tale of How Apollo 11 Almost Failed to Return From The Moon

The date is July 20, 1969. With minutes of fuel to spare, the astronauts of Apollo 11 are gliding across the surface of the moon, looking for a place to land. There’s just one problem: boulders strewn across the landscape prevent a quick touchdown.

Back in Houston, mission control is issuing periodic readouts of the spacecraft’s fuel status. The seconds tick by until Apollo 11 is running on fumes. The situation is urgent. If the astronauts can’t land, they’ll be stranded on the moon until they die, with millions following the broadcast live from earth.

As the astronauts frantically search for a landing zone, the health monitoring equipment linked to the men goes haywire. The chart you see above shows Buzz Aldrin’s EKG readout in the final moments before touchdown, which is marked by the long vertical line about three-fourths of the way through the graph. It’s a rare, alternative glimpse of a critical moment in history, preserved by TEDMED curator and Priceline.com founder Jay Walker in a vast library devoted to science, medicine, and history.

As we know, the astronauts landed safely and returned home. But for a few heartstopping seconds, anything could have happened — and this chart tells the tale.

July 27, 2012
ilovecharts:

Every Trip To The Moon, Ever

ilovecharts:

Every Trip To The Moon, Ever

Liked posts on Tumblr: More liked posts »