July 24, 2012
imwithkanye:

First Female U.S. Astronaut, Sally Ride, Comes Out In Obituary | BuzzFeed
“I hope it makes it easier for kids growing up gay that they know that another one of their heroes was like them,” Sally Ride’s sister, Bear Ride, said.

imwithkanye:

First Female U.S. Astronaut, Sally Ride, Comes Out In Obituary | BuzzFeed

“I hope it makes it easier for kids growing up gay that they know that another one of their heroes was like them,” Sally Ride’s sister, Bear Ride, said.

(via huffingtonpost)

March 8, 2012
Andrew Breitbart’s Legacy: Credit and Blame Where It’s Due

It is too much to call Breitbart a visionary. The “flatter media” he helped advance, for better and worse, was inevitable once the Web came along. But when early Internet age publishing is chronicled, his name belongs on a list that includes Andrew Sullivan, Mickey Kaus, Glenn Reynolds, Megan McArdle, Josh Marshall, Matt Drudge, Eugene Volokh, Jonah Goldberg, Arianna Huffington, Markos Moulistas, Jane Hamsher, Matthew Yglesias, Ezra Klein and others. For better and worse, they’ve all shaped the medium and the messages of our era.
Due to the untimeliness of Breitbart’s death, there has been an understandable reluctance to examine his achievements alongside his shortcomings, especially on right-leaning Web sites, for arguing about the man’s memory almost immediately turned into another skirmish between ideological tribes. But disagreeing about whether his professional legacy was a boon to the country, as many conservatives insist, or an overall detriment, as others claim, isn’t likely to get us anywhere. Suffice it to say that even history’s greatest heroes, beloved patriarchs, and loyal family dogs are imperfect. The most hard-core movement conservatives should be able to acknowledge that some aspects of Breitbart’s professional life would be better repudiated than celebrated or copied, even if their overall assessment of the man remains emphatically positive.
This isn’t an attempt to persuade you to share my conclusions about Breitbart’s overall impact on the world. The reader can draw that conclusion as well as I can. But having remarked on his innovator’s spirit, his contributions to the Web, his passion for his causes, his humor, and his loyalty to family and friends, it profits us to confront his flaws and transgressions forthrightly. Were he a monster, no one would be tempted to copy him. Precisely because he was a charismatic hero to many, avoiding his mistakes requires us to be unsentimental.
Read more. [Image: Reuters]

Andrew Breitbart’s Legacy: Credit and Blame Where It’s Due

It is too much to call Breitbart a visionary. The “flatter media” he helped advance, for better and worse, was inevitable once the Web came along. But when early Internet age publishing is chronicled, his name belongs on a list that includes Andrew Sullivan, Mickey Kaus, Glenn Reynolds, Megan McArdle, Josh Marshall, Matt Drudge, Eugene Volokh, Jonah Goldberg, Arianna Huffington, Markos Moulistas, Jane Hamsher, Matthew Yglesias, Ezra Klein and others. For better and worse, they’ve all shaped the medium and the messages of our era.

Due to the untimeliness of Breitbart’s death, there has been an understandable reluctance to examine his achievements alongside his shortcomings, especially on right-leaning Web sites, for arguing about the man’s memory almost immediately turned into another skirmish between ideological tribes. But disagreeing about whether his professional legacy was a boon to the country, as many conservatives insist, or an overall detriment, as others claim, isn’t likely to get us anywhere. Suffice it to say that even history’s greatest heroes, beloved patriarchs, and loyal family dogs are imperfect. The most hard-core movement conservatives should be able to acknowledge that some aspects of Breitbart’s professional life would be better repudiated than celebrated or copied, even if their overall assessment of the man remains emphatically positive.

This isn’t an attempt to persuade you to share my conclusions about Breitbart’s overall impact on the world. The reader can draw that conclusion as well as I can. But having remarked on his innovator’s spirit, his contributions to the Web, his passion for his causes, his humor, and his loyalty to family and friends, it profits us to confront his flaws and transgressions forthrightly. Were he a monster, no one would be tempted to copy him. Precisely because he was a charismatic hero to many, avoiding his mistakes requires us to be unsentimental.

Read more. [Image: Reuters]

February 27, 2012
Remembering Jan Berenstain, co-creator of ‘The Berenstain Bears’

In a sad development for those who grew up with her ubiquitous children’s books, Jan Berenstain, co-creator of The Berenstain Bears, died on Friday at age 88 after suffering a severe stroke the day before, reports the Associated Press. The longtime resident of Solebury, Pennsylvania is survived by four grandchildren and her two sons, one of which, named Mike, told the AP’s Joann Loviglio that his mother remained productive until the end. ”She was working on two books and had been doing illustrations until the day before she passed away.” All told, about 260 million of the jovial books filled with time-tested, family-oriented adages made their way into the hands of children and parents since the series first began.
Read more. [Image: Associated Press]

Remembering Jan Berenstain, co-creator of ‘The Berenstain Bears’

In a sad development for those who grew up with her ubiquitous children’s books, Jan Berenstain, co-creator of The Berenstain Bears, died on Friday at age 88 after suffering a severe stroke the day before, reports the Associated Press. The longtime resident of Solebury, Pennsylvania is survived by four grandchildren and her two sons, one of which, named Mike, told the AP’s Joann Loviglio that his mother remained productive until the end. ”She was working on two books and had been doing illustrations until the day before she passed away.” All told, about 260 million of the jovial books filled with time-tested, family-oriented adages made their way into the hands of children and parents since the series first began.

Read more. [Image: Associated Press]

February 7, 2012
The Very Last World War I Veteran Has Died

A British woman who served with the Royal Air Force for the last two months of World War I was the last known veteran of the war when she died in her sleep Saturday night. Florence Green joined the RAF at the age of 17 and died just before her 111th birthday, which would have been Feb. 19. She had been a mess steward with the air force, the BBC reported, serving in two U.K. air bases after she joined up on Sept. 13 1918.
Green follows Claude Choules, who was the last WWI combatant before he died in May 2011, and Frank Buckles, the last American veteran of the war, who died in February 2011. All were 110 years old.
[Image: BBC News]

The Very Last World War I Veteran Has Died

A British woman who served with the Royal Air Force for the last two months of World War I was the last known veteran of the war when she died in her sleep Saturday night. Florence Green joined the RAF at the age of 17 and died just before her 111th birthday, which would have been Feb. 19. She had been a mess steward with the air force, the BBC reported, serving in two U.K. air bases after she joined up on Sept. 13 1918.

Green follows Claude Choules, who was the last WWI combatant before he died in May 2011, and Frank Buckles, the last American veteran of the war, who died in February 2011. All were 110 years old.

[Image: BBC News]

12:10pm
  
Filed under: Obituary WWI News 
September 13, 2011

obitoftheday:

Obit of the Day: Man of Many Murals

When William Walker organized the painting of The Wall of Respect in 1967, he had not planned to begin a national movement of public art. The mural, painted by dozens of Chicago artists, featured prominent African American politicians, scientists, musicians and artists. It is recognized as the first public mural, a style that now dots urban landscapes. (These murals differ from other murals, such as those painted in post offices under the auspices of the WPA in the 1930s, because they are often sponsored by individual neighborhoods or businesses. The murals are also located on an exterior wall making them available for all passersby to see.)

Walker would, by himself and in partnership with others, paint seventeen murals between 1967 and 1988. The murals were never simply attempts to beautify a building or neighborhood but were social and political statements. Two early Walker murals are in Detroit including the Harriet Tubman Memorial Wall, but the rest of his works were painted on the south side of Chicago.

Since many of Walker’s murals are painted on privately owned buildings, they were often neglected or destroyed over time. There was a concerted effort to preserve several Walker murals for the last decade and a half, including History of the Packing House Worker (1975, restored in 1998), Childhood Is Without Prejudice (1977, restored in 1993 and 2009), and Wall of Dreaming and Man’s Inhumanity to Man (1973, restored in 2003).

Walker was named “City Brightener” by the city of Chicago in 1986 and is a member of the Illinois Labor Society’s Hall of Honor.

He died at the age of 84.

Images courtesy of:
Top left - Blackqueen: press (Childhood Is Without Prejudice)
Top right - Sherrinemae’s photostream on Flickr (Wall of Daydreaming and Man’s Inhumanity to Man)
Bottom left - Mad About the Mural (All of Mankind, 1971-1973)
Bottom right - http://ms-f10-bsykes.blogspot.com (Childhood Is Without Prejudice)

June 10, 2011
obitoftheday:

Obit of the Day: “Thirteen Cokes, Please.”
Clara Luper, an Oklahoma history teacher, ordered those Cokes at Katz Drugstore in Oklahoma City on August 19, 1958 for herself and twelve children, ages 6 to 17. Lunch counters in Oklahoma, like much of the South, were segregated. This wasn’t just a request for drinks, but a request for civil rights.
Waitresses ignored them. Other patrons did not: leaving the restaurant, pouring drinks on them, cursing at them. (Did I mention there were children as young as six?) The group left after a few hours without a drink. They returned the next day and were served their Cokes, and burgers, too.
“Within that hamburger was the whole essence of democracy.” - Clara Luper
Note: This took place a year and a half before the much more famous sit-in at the Greensboro (SC) Woolworth’s on February 1, 1960.
Luper would continue her fight to desegregate public spaces in Oklahoma City. She was arrested 26 times between 1958 and the passage of Oklahoma law to desegregate. (Passed two days after the Civil Rights Act.)
(Fantastic image is courtesy of Black Past.)

obitoftheday:

Obit of the Day: “Thirteen Cokes, Please.”

Clara Luper, an Oklahoma history teacher, ordered those Cokes at Katz Drugstore in Oklahoma City on August 19, 1958 for herself and twelve children, ages 6 to 17. Lunch counters in Oklahoma, like much of the South, were segregated. This wasn’t just a request for drinks, but a request for civil rights.

Waitresses ignored them. Other patrons did not: leaving the restaurant, pouring drinks on them, cursing at them. (Did I mention there were children as young as six?) The group left after a few hours without a drink. They returned the next day and were served their Cokes, and burgers, too.

“Within that hamburger was the whole essence of democracy.” - Clara Luper

Note: This took place a year and a half before the much more famous sit-in at the Greensboro (SC) Woolworth’s on February 1, 1960.

Luper would continue her fight to desegregate public spaces in Oklahoma City. She was arrested 26 times between 1958 and the passage of Oklahoma law to desegregate. (Passed two days after the Civil Rights Act.)

(Fantastic image is courtesy of Black Past.)

June 7, 2011
obitoftheday:

Obit of the Day (Historical): Shel Silverstein
Silverstein actually died on May 10, 1999, this is too perfect to pass up. (Here’s OOTD’s post on Silverstein from last month
Thanks to dallasclayton:

I saw this “Sidewalk Ends” sign the other day and it occurred to me that as a children’s book author/part time vandal I was obligated to add a sign of my own. R.I.P. 


Shel Silverstein, apart from being a fabulous author, was also responsible for a few secret, raunchy recording sessions. Shel, we hardly knew ye.

obitoftheday:

Obit of the Day (Historical): Shel Silverstein

Silverstein actually died on May 10, 1999, this is too perfect to pass up. (Here’s OOTD’s post on Silverstein from last month

Thanks to dallasclayton:

I saw this “Sidewalk Ends” sign the other day and it occurred to me that as a children’s book author/part time vandal I was obligated to add a sign of my own. R.I.P. 

Shel Silverstein, apart from being a fabulous author, was also responsible for a few secret, raunchy recording sessions. Shel, we hardly knew ye.

May 31, 2011
obitoftheday:

Obit of the Day: Mayan Legend
Merle Robertson died at the age of 97. Among Meso-American archaeologists, she became one of the most influential individuals, male or female, in the field. Deciding to focus on Mexican and Central American ancient history rather than more “traditional” locations such as Egypt and Greece, gave Robertson a clean slate to begin her work in the 1940s.
For four decades she travelled to over 130 different ancient American archaeological sites, recording the incredible carvings of the Mayan people through rubbings (using a new technique that involved rice paper and ink), drawing (a skill she honed with help from her architect father and  legendary Western artist, Charles Russell), and photography.
The importance of her work to the preservation of Mayan art and history was recognized by the Mexican government in 1993 when she was awarded the Order of the Aztec Eagle, the highest award given to foreigners. (The medal looks as cool as the name suggests.)
Even without whips, guns, fedoras, and Nazis, archaeology is pretty awesome.
(Drawing of Mayan art is copyright Merle Green Robertson via alongdrive.com)

obitoftheday:

Obit of the Day: Mayan Legend

Merle Robertson died at the age of 97. Among Meso-American archaeologists, she became one of the most influential individuals, male or female, in the field. Deciding to focus on Mexican and Central American ancient history rather than more “traditional” locations such as Egypt and Greece, gave Robertson a clean slate to begin her work in the 1940s.

For four decades she travelled to over 130 different ancient American archaeological sites, recording the incredible carvings of the Mayan people through rubbings (using a new technique that involved rice paper and ink), drawing (a skill she honed with help from her architect father and legendary Western artist, Charles Russell), and photography.

The importance of her work to the preservation of Mayan art and history was recognized by the Mexican government in 1993 when she was awarded the Order of the Aztec Eagle, the highest award given to foreigners. (The medal looks as cool as the name suggests.)

Even without whips, guns, fedoras, and Nazis, archaeology is pretty awesome.

(Drawing of Mayan art is copyright Merle Green Robertson via alongdrive.com)

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