April 17, 2014

In Focus: Battling for Control of Eastern Ukraine

For the past few weeks, armed groups of pro-Russian men have been storming and seizing government buildings in towns across eastern Ukraine. Angered by the new pro-western Ukrainian government and emboldened by Russia’s annexation of Crimea, these groups are demanding separation from Ukraine. Ukraine’s new government has asked for western assistance, as it tries to recapture police stations, airbases, and other government properties — without resorting to violence that may trigger a Russian response. Meanwhile, thousands of Ukrainian soldiers are deploying in eastern Ukraine, with even more Russian soldiers massed on the other side of the border. NATO officials said they planned to deploy more forces in eastern Europe and called for Russia to stop “destabilizing” the former Soviet satellite, which has been in deep turmoil since the ouster of the pro-Kremlin leadership in February.

Read more.

April 10, 2014

In Focus: London and the U.K. From Above

Photographer Jason Hawkes has been making fascinating aerial images since 1991. With a gyro-stabilized camera, he takes photos directly from the open door of a helicopter. Hawkes has covered subjects around the world, but specializes in aerial shots of the United Kingdom. Once more, he’s been kind enough to share some of his recent photos with us here.

Read more.

April 4, 2014

In Focus: Afghanistan Seen Through the Lens of Anja Niedringhaus

Niedringhaus, a photographer with the Associated Press, was shot and killed by an Afghan policeman. Fellow reporter Kathy Gannon was also wounded.

April 3, 2014

In Focus: The Aftermath of Chile’s Earthquake

Late Tuesday night, a tremendous earthquake struck off the coast of northern Chile, near the town of Iquique. The magnitude 8.2 quake triggered a localized tsunami that battered the coastline with seven-foot waves. The shallow temblor (12.5 miles below the seabed) also set off dozens of aftershocks — 18 of them above magnitude 5.0 so far, including a magnitude 7.6 aftershock last night. Surprisingly, damage and casualties were very limited. Several fires erupted, smaller structures suffered minimal damage, and six deaths were reported — the victims were either crushed under debris or suffered fatal heart attacks. Today, Chile’s navy cancelled a tsunami alert and its emergency office, Onemi, which had earlier asked residents to evacuate the coastline, said people could return to their homes.

Read more.

March 31, 2014

In Focus: The Modern Face of Kabul

Despite decades of conflict in Afghanistan, the country’s capital city of Kabul is home to a vibrant youth scene, a handful of sleek shopping malls, cafes, and more. Reuters photographer Morteza Nikoubazl recently set out to document modern Kabul, populated by musicians, artists, athletes, and activists who are trying to live 21st-century lives in spite of massive infrastructure problems and the ever-present threat of militant attacks. Afghanistan is preparing for an election on April 5 that should mark the first democratic transfer of power in the country’s history, but it has been hit by a tide of violence as the Taliban has ordered its fighters to disrupt the vote and threatened to kill anyone who participates. Many of the people in these images were happy to be photographed, but did not want to give their names. This photo essay is part of the ongoing series here on Afghanistan.

Read more.

March 26, 2014

In Focus: St. Petersburg from Above

Recently, photographer Amos Chapple spent some time in Saint Petersburg, Russia’s second-largest city. He used a small drone to lift his camera high above the cathedrals and fortresses, capturing some amazing aerial photos. Chapple: “There’s a legend in Russia that Saint Petersburg was constructed in the blue heavens and lowered in one piece into the marshland, ‘for how otherwise could a city so beautiful exist in a region so bleak.’” Chapple, has previously showed us Stalin’s Rope Roads, and took us on a trip to Turkmenistan.

Read more.

March 21, 2014

In Focus: The First Day of Spring

Yesterday was the vernal equinox, the first day of spring in the Northern Hemisphere, despite continued wintry conditions in a few places. As the sunlight becomes more prevalent, people, plants, and animals are beginning to emerge from their winter modes to step outside, bloom, and otherwise welcome the sunshine. These photos show glimpses of the new season from around the world, as we shake off the winter and greet the spring.

Read more.

March 19, 2014

In Focus: In Syria, Three Years of War

Last weekend marked the third anniversary of Syria’s civil war, a conflict that has, according to the Syrian Observatory for Human Rights, claimed the lives of more than 146,000 people, at least a third of them civilians. As forces loyal to Syrian President Bashar al-Assad appear to be making slow progress against rebel forces, the humanitarian crisis has grown astronomically — as many as 2.5 million Syrians have now fled the country. Fractured rebel groups continue to fight each other, as well as Assad’s troops, with civilians bearing the brunt of attack and counterattack, their neighborhoods reduced to rubble by mortar shells and barrel bombs. Gathered here are images from Syria over the past few months.

Read more.

March 19, 2014

gettyimages:

The photographer who gave his life to tell the truth about Gaddafi’s Libya

Read the full article on The Guardian

Top photo: A Liberian militia commander loyal to the government exults after firing a rocket-propelled grenade at rebel forces at a key strategic bridge July 20, 2003 in Monrovia, Liberia.

Middle photo: Samar Hassan, 5, screams after her parents were killed by U.S. Soldiers with the 25th Infantry Division in a shooting January 18, 2005 in Tal Afar, Iraq.

Bottom photo: A rebel fighter celebrates as his comrades fire a rocket barrage toward the positions of troops loyal to Libyan ruler Muammar Gaddafi April 14, 2011 west of Ajdabiyah, Libya.

(via globalpost)

December 18, 2013
Will a Billion Selfies Make Us Miss the World’s Biggest Moments?

It’s never been easier to take a photograph—and harder to be a photojournalist. Are iconic images a thing of the past?

Read more. [Image: Osman Orsa]

Will a Billion Selfies Make Us Miss the World’s Biggest Moments?

It’s never been easier to take a photograph—and harder to be a photojournalist. Are iconic images a thing of the past?
Read more. [Image: Osman Orsa]

Liked posts on Tumblr: More liked posts »