October 2, 2013
From Fort Sumter to Ellis Island, a Photo Tour of America's Closed National Monuments

(Source: thisiscitylab)

December 7, 2012
The Best Photos of 2012

A man walks inside of the crumbling oval skeleton of the House of the Bulgarian Communist Party on mount Buzludzha in central Bulgaria on March 14, 2012.
[Image: Dimitar Dilkoff/AFP/Getty Images]

We’re not the only ones who think this was pulled straight out of Close Encounters of the Third Kind, right?

The Best Photos of 2012

A man walks inside of the crumbling oval skeleton of the House of the Bulgarian Communist Party on mount Buzludzha in central Bulgaria on March 14, 2012.

[Image: Dimitar Dilkoff/AFP/Getty Images]

We’re not the only ones who think this was pulled straight out of Close Encounters of the Third Kind, right?

June 19, 2012
Farmers herd a flock of ducks along a street towards a pond as residents drive next to them in Taizhou, Zhejiang province, on June 17, 2012. 
[Image: Reuters/China Daily]

Farmers herd a flock of ducks along a street towards a pond as residents drive next to them in Taizhou, Zhejiang province, on June 17, 2012.

[Image: Reuters/China Daily]

August 15, 2011
World War II: Daring Raids and Brutal Reprisals

In early 1942, as the Axis powers pursued their war aims, Allied forces were still reeling but working on a wider strategy. Japan swept through the southern Pacific, conquering Burma, Malaya, the Dutch East Indies, Singapore, and the Philippines. Germany regrouped on the Eastern Front, holding off several Soviet attacks and preparing for a summer offensive. But during this time, American bombers successfully struck Japanese targets in a daring, morale-boosting raid led by Lt. Col. James Doolittle, and British forces destroyed an important dock facility in German-occupied St. Nazaire, France. Most of Doolittle’s raiders landed in China, receiving assistance from villagers. Those locals paid dearly when Japanese reprisals killed an estimated 250,000 Chinese. The fall of the Philippines left the invading Japanese with tens of thousands more U.S. and Filipino prisoners than they’d anticipated. This led to a brutal forced relocation now known as the Bataan Death March, where thousands of weak, starving men were beaten and killed en route to a Japanese prison camp.
Above: Sergeant P. Dorzhiev, a Russian sniper who killed 181 Germans on the Leningrad front, looking through binoculars, and holding a rifle, sometime in 1942.

See more photos at In Focus

World War II: Daring Raids and Brutal Reprisals

In early 1942, as the Axis powers pursued their war aims, Allied forces were still reeling but working on a wider strategy. Japan swept through the southern Pacific, conquering Burma, Malaya, the Dutch East Indies, Singapore, and the Philippines. Germany regrouped on the Eastern Front, holding off several Soviet attacks and preparing for a summer offensive. But during this time, American bombers successfully struck Japanese targets in a daring, morale-boosting raid led by Lt. Col. James Doolittle, and British forces destroyed an important dock facility in German-occupied St. Nazaire, France. Most of Doolittle’s raiders landed in China, receiving assistance from villagers. Those locals paid dearly when Japanese reprisals killed an estimated 250,000 Chinese. The fall of the Philippines left the invading Japanese with tens of thousands more U.S. and Filipino prisoners than they’d anticipated. This led to a brutal forced relocation now known as the Bataan Death March, where thousands of weak, starving men were beaten and killed en route to a Japanese prison camp.

Above: Sergeant P. Dorzhiev, a Russian sniper who killed 181 Germans on the Leningrad front, looking through binoculars, and holding a rifle, sometime in 1942.

See more photos at In Focus

July 11, 2011
newshour:

More than 10 million people are desperately in need of food assistance in Ethiopia, Somalia and Kenya, the World Food Program estimated this week.
The situation in Somalia in particular is the “worst humanitarian disaster in the world,” the U.N. refugee agency said on Sunday.
Abshira Abdukadir, a four-year-old Somali girl suffering from severe diarrhea and having trouble breathing, is looked after by her parents hours after they finally reached a refugee camp in northeast Kenya and were able to get medical assistance for their ailing daughter on July 6, 2011. (ROBERTO SCHMIDT/AFP/Getty Images)

newshour:

More than 10 million people are desperately in need of food assistance in Ethiopia, Somalia and Kenya, the World Food Program estimated this week.

The situation in Somalia in particular is the “worst humanitarian disaster in the world,” the U.N. refugee agency said on Sunday.

Abshira Abdukadir, a four-year-old Somali girl suffering from severe diarrhea and having trouble breathing, is looked after by her parents hours after they finally reached a refugee camp in northeast Kenya and were able to get medical assistance for their ailing daughter on July 6, 2011. (ROBERTO SCHMIDT/AFP/Getty Images)

May 31, 2011
abcworldnews:

Last night at roughly 8:17pm New Yorkers got a chance to experience “Manhattanhenge”, the semiannual occurrence where the setting sun aligns perfectly with east-west streets.  If you missed it don’t worry though, a second date this year is expected to take place on Monday, July 11 at 8:25 p.m.   
Photo Credit: Anthony Behar/Sipa Press via AP Images 

abcworldnews:

Last night at roughly 8:17pm New Yorkers got a chance to experience “Manhattanhenge”, the semiannual occurrence where the setting sun aligns perfectly with east-west streets.  If you missed it don’t worry though, a second date this year is expected to take place on Monday, July 11 at 8:25 p.m.  

Photo Credit: Anthony Behar/Sipa Press via AP Images 

May 6, 2011
When We Tested Nuclear Bombs: 

Since the time of Trinity — the first nuclear explosion in 1945 —  nearly 2,000 nuclear tests have been performed, with the majority taking  place during the 1960s and 1970s. When the technology was new, tests  were frequent and often spectacular, and led to the development of  newer, more deadly weapons. But starting in the 1990s, there have been  efforts to limit the future testing of nuclear weapons, including a U.S.  moratorium and a U.N. comprehensive test ban treaty. As a result,  testing has slowed — though not halted — and there are questions about  the future. Who will take over for those experienced engineers who are  now near retirement, and should we act as stewards with our enormous  stockpiles of nuclear weapons? Gathered here are images from the first  30 years of nuclear testing.

See all the staggering photos of nuclear explosion (and how the technology changed society) at The Atlantic’s In Focus.
[Image: A 1971 photo of a nuclear bomb detonated by the French government at the Mururoa atoll, French Polynesia. (AP Photo)]

When We Tested Nuclear Bombs:

Since the time of Trinity — the first nuclear explosion in 1945 — nearly 2,000 nuclear tests have been performed, with the majority taking place during the 1960s and 1970s. When the technology was new, tests were frequent and often spectacular, and led to the development of newer, more deadly weapons. But starting in the 1990s, there have been efforts to limit the future testing of nuclear weapons, including a U.S. moratorium and a U.N. comprehensive test ban treaty. As a result, testing has slowed — though not halted — and there are questions about the future. Who will take over for those experienced engineers who are now near retirement, and should we act as stewards with our enormous stockpiles of nuclear weapons? Gathered here are images from the first 30 years of nuclear testing.

See all the staggering photos of nuclear explosion (and how the technology changed society) at The Atlantic’s In Focus.

[Image: A 1971 photo of a nuclear bomb detonated by the French government at the Mururoa atoll, French Polynesia. (AP Photo)]

2:24pm
  
Filed under: In Focus Nuclear Bombs Photos 
May 5, 2011
My Favorite Photo Ever: A Military Dog Jumping Out of a Helicopter:

…a dog was among the contingent of commandos sent to kill Osama bin  Laden. The two lead photographs show dogs jumping out of aircraft, which  I find totally mindblowing.

Read on and see the other photo that blew Alexis Madrigal’s mind at The Atlantic.

My Favorite Photo Ever: A Military Dog Jumping Out of a Helicopter:

…a dog was among the contingent of commandos sent to kill Osama bin Laden. The two lead photographs show dogs jumping out of aircraft, which I find totally mindblowing.

Read on and see the other photo that blew Alexis Madrigal’s mind at The Atlantic.

April 20, 2011
In Focus’s Alan Taylor shares alarming, stunning photos of how the Texas wildfires are spreading—and how we’re fighting them:

March 2011 was the state’s driest March on record, leaving it in extreme  drought and fueling recent wildfires that have destroyed hundreds of  homes and burned more than one million acres over the past two weeks.  High winds have been driving some fires eastward, closer to the densely  populated Dallas-Fort Worth area. Governor Rick Perry has asked  President Barack Obama for federal disaster funding, with the cost of  fighting the fires estimated to be $2 million per day, supporting nearly  2,000 personnel across the state.

See many more unbelievable photos from Texas at In Focus. 
[Image: AP/LM Otero]

In Focus’s Alan Taylor shares alarming, stunning photos of how the Texas wildfires are spreading—and how we’re fighting them:

March 2011 was the state’s driest March on record, leaving it in extreme drought and fueling recent wildfires that have destroyed hundreds of homes and burned more than one million acres over the past two weeks. High winds have been driving some fires eastward, closer to the densely populated Dallas-Fort Worth area. Governor Rick Perry has asked President Barack Obama for federal disaster funding, with the cost of fighting the fires estimated to be $2 million per day, supporting nearly 2,000 personnel across the state.

See many more unbelievable photos from Texas at In Focus.

[Image: AP/LM Otero]

February 22, 2011
Earthquake in New Zealand

A 6.3 magnitude earthquake struck the Canterbury region of New Zealand’s South Island, near the country’s second-largest city, Christchurch. It is an aftershock of a massive, deeper earthquake that hit New Zealand last September, and has already caused more damage, injuries, and fatalities than the earlier quake. Hundreds of structures in Christchurch have now been severely damaged or collapsed completely. At the moment, at least 65 deaths have been confirmed, hundreds have been injured, and many are still missing.

See more photos from In Focus
[Mark Mitchell/AP]

Earthquake in New Zealand

A 6.3 magnitude earthquake struck the Canterbury region of New Zealand’s South Island, near the country’s second-largest city, Christchurch. It is an aftershock of a massive, deeper earthquake that hit New Zealand last September, and has already caused more damage, injuries, and fatalities than the earlier quake. Hundreds of structures in Christchurch have now been severely damaged or collapsed completely. At the moment, at least 65 deaths have been confirmed, hundreds have been injured, and many are still missing.

See more photos from In Focus

[Mark Mitchell/AP]

11:00am
  
Filed under: news new zealand photos in focus 
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