November 1, 2013
Russell Brand: Good Pundit, Bad Thinker

The comedian wants his ideas to be taken seriously in the political world, but his call for revolution doesn’t deserve it.
Read more. [Image: Mario Anzuoni/Reuters]

Russell Brand: Good Pundit, Bad Thinker

The comedian wants his ideas to be taken seriously in the political world, but his call for revolution doesn’t deserve it.

Read more. [Image: Mario Anzuoni/Reuters]

October 29, 2013
Chinese Communism and the 70-Year Itch

The Seven Year Itch fashioned a classic American romantic comedy around the notion that after seven years of marriage, a spouse’s interest in a monogamous relationship starts to wane. The premise of the Marilyn Monroe film made for some great laughs and iconic images, but it was not pure fancy. A lot of studies over time have shown that the average length of a first marriage is about seven or eight years.
There is an interesting parallel in politics; specifically, the life span of one-party regimes, though in this case we might call it the “70-year itch.” The U.S.S.R. is a prime example. By the time Mikhail Gorbachev took command of the Soviet Union in 1985, the rot in the Soviet system, and the corresponding decline of its legitimacy, were well advanced. “Interest in the marriage” had long since begun to wane.  Gorbachev’s efforts to revive it with political opening and economic reform (glasnost and perestroika) only enabled the marriage to break up peacefully. When the Soviet Union collapsed in 1991, the Communist Party had been in power for a little more than 70 years. Similarly, the Institutional Revolutionary Party (PRI) ruled in Mexico from its founding in 1929 until its defeat in the 2000 elections—71 years. 
Read more. [Image: Jason Lee/Reuters]

Chinese Communism and the 70-Year Itch

The Seven Year Itch fashioned a classic American romantic comedy around the notion that after seven years of marriage, a spouse’s interest in a monogamous relationship starts to wane. The premise of the Marilyn Monroe film made for some great laughs and iconic images, but it was not pure fancy. A lot of studies over time have shown that the average length of a first marriage is about seven or eight years.

There is an interesting parallel in politics; specifically, the life span of one-party regimes, though in this case we might call it the “70-year itch.” The U.S.S.R. is a prime example. By the time Mikhail Gorbachev took command of the Soviet Union in 1985, the rot in the Soviet system, and the corresponding decline of its legitimacy, were well advanced. “Interest in the marriage” had long since begun to wane.  Gorbachev’s efforts to revive it with political opening and economic reform (glasnost and perestroika) only enabled the marriage to break up peacefully. When the Soviet Union collapsed in 1991, the Communist Party had been in power for a little more than 70 years. Similarly, the Institutional Revolutionary Party (PRI) ruled in Mexico from its founding in 1929 until its defeat in the 2000 elections—71 years.

Read more. [Image: Jason Lee/Reuters]

November 20, 2012
Syria’s Spray-Can Revolution

Seeing Syria’s children as passive victims of a tyrannical regime, however, underestimates their role in the revolt. If they’ve been victims, they’ve also been protagonists. Think back to how all this began. In March 2011, 10 Syrians between the ages of 9 and 15, inspired by the rebellions in Egypt and Tunisia, daubed The people want to topple the regime! on the walls of a school building in the neglected provincial city of Dara’a. The vicious reaction of the secret police, or mukhabarat — they arrested and, by some accounts, tortured the children — led to popular demonstrations; from these spiraled everything else. This isn’t been a samizdat revolution, sparked by epistles from dissident intellectuals. It was started by the spray cans of schoolchildren, and by other young people who then turned to Facebook and YouTube to get the message out.

Read more. [Image: Amr Dalsh/Reuters]

Syria’s Spray-Can Revolution

Seeing Syria’s children as passive victims of a tyrannical regime, however, underestimates their role in the revolt. If they’ve been victims, they’ve also been protagonists. Think back to how all this began. In March 2011, 10 Syrians between the ages of 9 and 15, inspired by the rebellions in Egypt and Tunisia, daubed The people want to topple the regime! on the walls of a school building in the neglected provincial city of Dara’a. The vicious reaction of the secret police, or mukhabarat — they arrested and, by some accounts, tortured the children — led to popular demonstrations; from these spiraled everything else. This isn’t been a samizdat revolution, sparked by epistles from dissident intellectuals. It was started by the spray cans of schoolchildren, and by other young people who then turned to Facebook and YouTube to get the message out.

Read more. [Image: Amr Dalsh/Reuters]

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