January 14, 2014

Meet ‘Robosimian,’ the Robot that Apes an Ape

It doesn’t throw its own feces, but that’s mostly because it doesn’t have them. 

Meet the Robosimian, a four-limbed robot designed to look and act, as its name helpfully suggests, like a primate. Created by the Robotics team at the NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory, the pseudo-simian (nickname: “Clyde”) finished fifth in DARPA’s recent Robotics Challenge in Florida. And it has now been named a finalist in that competition—which means that Clyde, along with seven other automatons, will be receiving continued DARPA funding and a spot in the agency’s Robotics Finals in late 2014.

As a matter of engineering, the Robosimian is impressive. As a matter of entertainment, the Robosimian is hilarious.

Read more.

December 4, 2013

No Big Deal, Just a Robot Walking Around Campus

January 16, 2013
'This Robot Is the Latest Weapon in the War on Birds'

[…] A bird strike — sometimes also called a Bird Aircraft Strike Hazard, or BASH — remains a rare but destructive phenomenon. Which makes it one of those ironies that speak to the frailty of human technology: All the knowledge embedded in an aircraft — all the physical prowess, all the digital nuance — can still be thwarted by a coincidental collusion with birds. To the extent, per one estimate, that our feathered friends can cause more than a billion — billion, with a b — dollars’ worth of damage to aircraft in a single year. 
But that could be changing: Bird strikes could soon become a thing of the past. Researchers in South Korea have developed a mobile device that uses a combination of tracking software, microphones, and lasers — yes, lasers — to detect birds and then scare them away from airport runways. 
Read more. [Image: AP]

'This Robot Is the Latest Weapon in the War on Birds'

[…] A bird strike — sometimes also called a Bird Aircraft Strike Hazard, or BASH — remains a rare but destructive phenomenon. Which makes it one of those ironies that speak to the frailty of human technology: All the knowledge embedded in an aircraft — all the physical prowess, all the digital nuance — can still be thwarted by a coincidental collusion with birds. To the extent, per one estimate, that our feathered friends can cause more than a billion — billion, with a b — dollars’ worth of damage to aircraft in a single year. 

But that could be changing: Bird strikes could soon become a thing of the past. Researchers in South Korea have developed a mobile device that uses a combination of tracking software, microphones, and lasers — yes, lasers — to detect birds and then scare them away from airport runways. 

Read more. [Image: AP]

1:19pm
  
Filed under: Robot Hudson Flight Birds Technology 
October 19, 2012

In Focus: Robots at Work and Play

Advancements in robotics are continually taking place in the fields of space exploration, health care, public safety, entertainment, defense, and more. These machines — some fully autonomous, some requiring human input — extend our grasp, enhance our capabilities, and travel as our surrogates to places too dangerous for us to go. NASA currently has dozens of robotic missions underway, with satellites now in orbit around our moon and four planets — and two more on the way to Ceres and Pluto. Gathered here are recent images of robotic technology at the beginning of the 21st century. 

See more. [Images: USMC/Sgt. Mallory S. VanderSchans, AP Photo/Yonhap, Park Dong-joo]

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