April 14, 2014
theatlanticcities:

Over the weekend in San Francisco, lines stretched around the block for a Nicolas Cage-themed art show.

theatlanticcities:

Over the weekend in San Francisco, lines stretched around the block for a Nicolas Cage-themed art show.

(Source: thisiscitylab)

March 19, 2014
A 26-Story History of San Francisco

What Yelp’s new headquarters, the recently renovated landmark 140 New Montgomery, could teach the city’s tech scene.
Read more. [Image: Alexis Madrigal]

A 26-Story History of San Francisco

What Yelp’s new headquarters, the recently renovated landmark 140 New Montgomery, could teach the city’s tech scene.

Read more. [Image: Alexis Madrigal]

January 29, 2014
theatlanticcities:

"Walker isn’t claiming here to have put his finger on a great indictment of the Google Bus. But this property-assessment map in particular raises another issue: it’s clear that the entire city is becoming less affordable, even those places where tech workers can’t live within walking distance of their commuter shuttles. ‘I think it’s an important thing to point out,’ Walker says. Still, rising property values – at least by this metric – are particularly prevalent in the neighborhoods served by these buses.
Here is Walker’s take: ’The shuttles are accelerating the process of gentrification that was already happening. There is a feedback loop. The tech workers are attracted to neighborhoods that are nice, but by moving there en masse, they are feeding into these affluent clusters in the city and making them even more unattainable for the median earner, or for people who are struggling.’
That theory is likely closer to the truth. Inconveniently, it supports neither the simple claim that tech shuttles are the cause of all this change, nor the blanket defense that San Francisco can only stand to benefit from an influx of the people who ride them.”
Read more….

theatlanticcities:

"Walker isn’t claiming here to have put his finger on a great indictment of the Google Bus. But this property-assessment map in particular raises another issue: it’s clear that the entire city is becoming less affordable, even those places where tech workers can’t live within walking distance of their commuter shuttles. ‘I think it’s an important thing to point out,’ Walker says. Still, rising property values – at least by this metric – are particularly prevalent in the neighborhoods served by these buses.

Here is Walker’s take: ’The shuttles are accelerating the process of gentrification that was already happening. There is a feedback loop. The tech workers are attracted to neighborhoods that are nice, but by moving there en masse, they are feeding into these affluent clusters in the city and making them even more unattainable for the median earner, or for people who are struggling.’

That theory is likely closer to the truth. Inconveniently, it supports neither the simple claim that tech shuttles are the cause of all this change, nor the blanket defense that San Francisco can only stand to benefit from an influx of the people who ride them.”

Read more….

(Source: thisiscitylab)

January 28, 2014

theatlanticcities:

Cat cafes (as seen above in Japan) have yet to appear in the United States. That may change soon.

(Source: thisiscitylab)

January 10, 2014
Did San Francisco's Google Bus Deal Just Set a Price for Curb Space?

(Source: thisiscitylab)

November 15, 2013

Batkid: A Heartwarming, Very 2013 Story

Much of the work we do for our kids, whether as parents or as siblings or as detached aficionados of the adorable, involves fiction. We tell children stories, about dragons and princes and mischievous monsters. We inform them of the doings of Santa Claus and the Tooth Fairy. We create worlds meant to inspire them and soothe them and delight them and protect them. 

Usually, we do this work on our own, individually: at bedtime, at storytime, with toys and dolls and movies. We don’t normally get residents of the real world to help us create our story worlds. The fictionalization of childhood is something that plays out, in general, at the level of the family. The parent. The teacher.

Except when it doesn’t. Except when the fiction involves a massive, verging-on-city-wide effort—to inspire a kid, and soothe him, and delight him, and protect him. Sometimes, the fiction plays out along the lines of a network.

I mention this because of Batkid. In everyday life—the life that can be all too nonfictional—the Batkid is named Miles. He is 5 years old. He lives, with his family, near San Francisco. He has been battling leukemia since he was nearly 2. He is, and hopefully will remain, in remission. 

Another thing about Miles: He loves Batman. Which led his parents to write to the Make-A-Wish foundation, asking it to help them perpetrate, for and on behalf of their son, the ultimate fiction. They wanted Patricia Wilson, head of the foundation in the Bay Area, to make Miles a Batkid. They wanted him to spend a day saving San Francisco.

Read more.

December 10, 2012

theatlanticvideo:

Fly Down California’s Craziest Hills on High-Tech Longboards

Beautifully shot videos showcase Loaded Boards’ innovations in longboard design, not to mention some stunning west coast landscapes. 

October 22, 2012

There’s Always Room for Jell-O Molded to Look Like San Francisco

No architectural model lasts forever, but Liz Hickok's facsimiles have less time than most: hardly a week before the mold sets in. That's because Hickok's choice material comes not from the art room but from the lunchroom.

Despite its undeniable kitsch, Hickok swears she’s not in the urban Jell-O model business for the novelty. “It’s because it’s alive and changing, just as our real cities are,” she writes in an email. “By using a medium that is perishable I can speak to the fragility and impermanence of our cities.”

See more. [Images: Liz Hickok]

August 14, 2012

Using Uber Ridership to Compare Cities and Neighborhoods 

In fact, we can quantify how city-like or not city-like any given neighborhood is. That is, we can ask, “how San Francisco-like is the Mission, really?” and “how much more like New York is the Financial District than it is San Francisco?”

And we can do this for every neighborhood. What do we find?

Cities have “stereotypical” neighborhoods that very strongly match the flow of their home cities, and some neighborhoods just don’t really seem to belong to their home city. They’re outliers.

Read more. [Image: Uber]

July 19, 2012
The Psychology Behind Why Creative People Cluster 

A large body of literature shows that highly creative people - artists, scientists, entrepreneurs and the like - are highly likely to be open to new experiences. An earlier study by Rentfrow and his colleague Sam Gosling of the University of Texas, titled “The New Geography of Personality,” tracked the five major personality types across states. They found open-to-experience people were more likely to “attempt to escape the ennui experienced in small-town environments by relocating to metropolitan areas where their interests in cultures and needs for social contact and stimulation are more easily met.” Read more.

[Image: Eric Broder Van Dyke/ Shutterstock.com]

The Psychology Behind Why Creative People Cluster 

A large body of literature shows that highly creative people - artists, scientists, entrepreneurs and the like - are highly likely to be open to new experiences. An earlier study by Rentfrow and his colleague Sam Gosling of the University of Texas, titled “The New Geography of Personality,” tracked the five major personality types across states. They found open-to-experience people were more likely to “attempt to escape the ennui experienced in small-town environments by relocating to metropolitan areas where their interests in cultures and needs for social contact and stimulation are more easily met.” Read more.

[Image: Eric Broder Van Dyke/ Shutterstock.com]

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