April 9, 2014
Why Hasn’t Congress Investigated Corruption in the NCAA?

PED use in baseball merited a Congressional hearing. A similar investigation should be probing into educational institutions’ use of athletics and athletes for profit.
Read more. [Image: Frank Franklin II/AP]

Why Hasn’t Congress Investigated Corruption in the NCAA?

PED use in baseball merited a Congressional hearing. A similar investigation should be probing into educational institutions’ use of athletics and athletes for profit.

Read more. [Image: Frank Franklin II/AP]

April 7, 2014
Of Course Student-Athletes Are University Employees

Are college athletes university employees? It’s a question that has gripped the sports world since January, when a group of Northwestern University football players petitioned the National Labor Relations Board to form a union. The debate has only intensified since March 26, when a regional director in Chicago surprised many by granting the players’ petition.
The backbone of regional director Peter Sung Ohr’s 24-page ruling that the players are employees and thus have the right to form a union was the exhaustive description of the responsibilities and time-consuming demands of Northwestern football players. The judge said the evidence put forth by the team members, led by former quarterback Kain Colter and the College Athletes Players Association, showed that football “student-athletes” at Northwestern spend 40 to 50 hours a week on football-related activities for the duration of the regular season and bowl season, and have a virtual year-round commitment to the program. Thus, they are employees under the National Labor Relations Act, Ohr concluded.
Read more. [Image: Paul Beaty/AP]

Of Course Student-Athletes Are University Employees

Are college athletes university employees? It’s a question that has gripped the sports world since January, when a group of Northwestern University football players petitioned the National Labor Relations Board to form a union. The debate has only intensified since March 26, when a regional director in Chicago surprised many by granting the players’ petition.

The backbone of regional director Peter Sung Ohr’s 24-page ruling that the players are employees and thus have the right to form a union was the exhaustive description of the responsibilities and time-consuming demands of Northwestern football players. The judge said the evidence put forth by the team members, led by former quarterback Kain Colter and the College Athletes Players Association, showed that football “student-athletes” at Northwestern spend 40 to 50 hours a week on football-related activities for the duration of the regular season and bowl season, and have a virtual year-round commitment to the program. Thus, they are employees under the National Labor Relations Act, Ohr concluded.

Read more. [Image: Paul Beaty/AP]

March 31, 2014
Here Is Every U.S. County’s Favorite Baseball Team (According to Facebook)

Happy Opening Day. What’s your favorite baseball team?
Wait, no, let me rephrase that: What’s the team you ‘like’ the most?
The Facebook Data Science has just answered that question for the whole country, at least at the county level. A representative of the team sent me the map above—here’s a link to a larger version.
Read more. [Image: Facebook Data Science]

Here Is Every U.S. County’s Favorite Baseball Team (According to Facebook)

Happy Opening Day. What’s your favorite baseball team?

Wait, no, let me rephrase that: What’s the team you ‘like’ the most?

The Facebook Data Science has just answered that question for the whole country, at least at the county level. A representative of the team sent me the map above—here’s a link to a larger version.

Read more. [Image: Facebook Data Science]

March 21, 2014
Is March Madness a Sporting Event—Or a Gambling Event?

Even the tiniest of office pools threaten the integrity of the game, according to the NCAA. But the organization knows that if it weren’t for bracketology, the madness wouldn’t be so mad.
Read more. [Image: Brennan Linsley/AP]

Is March Madness a Sporting Event—Or a Gambling Event?

Even the tiniest of office pools threaten the integrity of the game, according to the NCAA. But the organization knows that if it weren’t for bracketology, the madness wouldn’t be so mad.

Read more. [Image: Brennan Linsley/AP]

March 11, 2014
Should Pete Rose Be in the Hall of Fame? Let the Voters Decide

One  of baseball’s longest-standing controversies could likely be resolved if the players’ union got involved.
Read more. [Image: David Kohl/AP]

Should Pete Rose Be in the Hall of Fame? Let the Voters Decide

One  of baseball’s longest-standing controversies could likely be resolved if the players’ union got involved.

Read more. [Image: David Kohl/AP]

March 4, 2014
A Nationalist Brain: There’s Nothing So Satisfying As Belonging to a Group

It was a good old-fashioned Olympic scandal in Sochi, when South Korean figure skater Kim Yuna, known as “the Queen,” lost to a less experienced Russian. The judgment spurred millions of angry Tweets, and a Change.org petition protesting the result was the fastest growing one on site record—reportedly more than 1.2 million signatures in about 12 hours.
Skating officials and fans around the world have questioned the decision, but critics remain focused on the South Korean outrage, largely since their sports fanaticism has made headlines before. Diehard citizens of countries like South Korea may seem odd to some; a post on Yahoo had the misguided headline: “Deal with it, South Korea.” But this line of thinking fails to understand the nature of nationalism, an ideology strongly associated with war and extremism that is in fact a common psychological phenomenon seen in everyday life—including sports.
Read more. [Image: Vhadim Ghirda/AP Photo]

A Nationalist Brain: There’s Nothing So Satisfying As Belonging to a Group

It was a good old-fashioned Olympic scandal in Sochi, when South Korean figure skater Kim Yuna, known as “the Queen,” lost to a less experienced Russian. The judgment spurred millions of angry Tweets, and a Change.org petition protesting the result was the fastest growing one on site record—reportedly more than 1.2 million signatures in about 12 hours.

Skating officials and fans around the world have questioned the decision, but critics remain focused on the South Korean outrage, largely since their sports fanaticism has made headlines before. Diehard citizens of countries like South Korea may seem odd to some; a post on Yahoo had the misguided headline: “Deal with it, South Korea.” But this line of thinking fails to understand the nature of nationalism, an ideology strongly associated with war and extremism that is in fact a common psychological phenomenon seen in everyday life—including sports.

Read more. [Image: Vhadim Ghirda/AP Photo]

February 21, 2014
The Lesson of Sochi 2014: Figure Skating Takes Grit, Not Just Grace

“Redemption” is a word that gets tossed around a lot in figure skating—sports reporters have used it more times in this Olympics than I could even begin to count.
But in the end, figure skating at the 2014 Winter Olympics really was about redemption. This year’s event was full of occasions when no other word would do.
Read more. [Image: Vadim Ghirda/AP]

The Lesson of Sochi 2014: Figure Skating Takes Grit, Not Just Grace

“Redemption” is a word that gets tossed around a lot in figure skating—sports reporters have used it more times in this Olympics than I could even begin to count.

But in the end, figure skating at the 2014 Winter Olympics really was about redemption. This year’s event was full of occasions when no other word would do.

Read more. [Image: Vadim Ghirda/AP]

February 20, 2014
There Is No Olympic Hockey Rivalry Between the U.S. and Canada

For the second straight Winter Olympics, the U.S. and Canada are in each other’s way for hockey gold. The American and Canadian women face off in the gold medal game on Thursday at noon Eastern, while the men battle Friday in a semifinal match between tournament favorites.
The twin-bill North American throwdown has many people talking about a U.S.-Canada hockey rivalry being one of the best parts of these Winter Olympics. “If it seems like the USA-Canada Olympic rivalry is heated already, it might melt the ice by the end of the week,” trumpeted Bleacher Report’s Dan Levy. A video segment by USA Today’s Christine Brennan previewing Thursday’s Olympic action was titled “The Best Olympic Rivalry: USA-Canada in Women’s Hockey.” 
It’s true that the Olympic matchups between the U.S. and Canada have gotten more competitive, more dramatic, and more fierce in the last two decades. But a true rivalry has ebbs and flows—and for most of the last 90 years, Canada has owned the United States in Olympic hockey.
Read more. [Image: Petr David Josek/AP]

There Is No Olympic Hockey Rivalry Between the U.S. and Canada

For the second straight Winter Olympics, the U.S. and Canada are in each other’s way for hockey gold. The American and Canadian women face off in the gold medal game on Thursday at noon Eastern, while the men battle Friday in a semifinal match between tournament favorites.

The twin-bill North American throwdown has many people talking about a U.S.-Canada hockey rivalry being one of the best parts of these Winter Olympics. “If it seems like the USA-Canada Olympic rivalry is heated already, it might melt the ice by the end of the week,” trumpeted Bleacher Report’s Dan Levy. A video segment by USA Today’s Christine Brennan previewing Thursday’s Olympic action was titled “The Best Olympic Rivalry: USA-Canada in Women’s Hockey.”

It’s true that the Olympic matchups between the U.S. and Canada have gotten more competitive, more dramatic, and more fierce in the last two decades. But a true rivalry has ebbs and flows—and for most of the last 90 years, Canada has owned the United States in Olympic hockey.

Read more. [Image: Petr David Josek/AP]

February 20, 2014
The Art of Ice-Hockey Goaltending

"Goaltending is an extreme sport inside an extreme sport: Your job is to go out on the ice and repeatedly get in the way of a frozen hard-rubber disc that moves faster than anything you directly interact with in your normal life."
J.J. Gould, the executive editor of TheAtlantic.com and a former goalie, talks tactics.
Read more.

The Art of Ice-Hockey Goaltending

"Goaltending is an extreme sport inside an extreme sport: Your job is to go out on the ice and repeatedly get in the way of a frozen hard-rubber disc that moves faster than anything you directly interact with in your normal life."

J.J. Gould, the executive editor of TheAtlantic.com and a former goalie, talks tactics.

Read more.

February 20, 2014
The Oracle of Ice Hockey

In Finland not long after World War II, kids would play a street game called ice ball, which had few rules and less strategy. They’d scramble through neighborhoods buried in snow, batting and kicking a piece of cork the size of a tennis ball—graduating, eventually, if they were keen and had money for skates, to a soccer field covered with ice. But some of the more serious kids wanted to play hockey. Back then, teams weren’t especially well organized: the worst athlete was usually stuck in front of a net, while the better ones attacked. Until one day, in the early 1950s, a hockey team in Rauma put a kid called Upi, who had been a powerful skater since his ice-ball days, in the net. And his team began to win.
About 10 years later, Upi—emphasis on the oop—moved to Turku, on the southwestern coast, where he found a place in goal for one of the local hockey teams. Like Roy Hobbs, he fashioned his own stick. Turku was a port town, roughly halfway between Stockholm and the Soviet border, the gateway to a 20,000-island archipelago that extends into the Baltic Sea. Its people knew how to fish and build big ships. Few people had TVs. No book about how to be a goaltender had ever been translated into Finnish. And so nobody really knew what a goalie was supposed to do. (The first proper indoor ice-hockey rink in all of Finland wouldn’t be completed until 1965.) In this splendid isolation, a school of goaltending was born, with Upi, who today is 70, as its first practitioner and eventual guru.
Until recently, aside from a handful of Americans and Europeans, National Hockey League goalies were overwhelmingly Canadian. But at the turn of the millennium, the Finns began to arrive. In 2002, Pasi Nurminen secured a starting role in Atlanta. The next season, Miikka Kiprusoff led Calgary to the league-championship finals. And then it was as though a dam broke: Vesa Toskala, Kari Lehtonen, Niklas Bäckström, Pekka Rinne, Tuukka Rask. Before 2002, no Finnish goaltender had ever locked down a starting role in the NHL. Suddenly, a country with a population of just more than 5 million people was producing one-sixth of the league’s starting goalies, most of them true blue chips. The Finns, who have now won just about everything a goalie can win in the league, are not particularly distinguished at any other position. (One NHL general manager suggested to me that outside of goaltending, no Finnish skater would crack a list of even the top 50 Canadians.) Yet any of Finland’s three Olympic goalies could have started for Canada’s team this year. How deep is Finland’s pool of talent? In 2008, the Chicago Blackhawks signed an undrafted kid who’d only recently started playing in Finland’s top professional league—before that he’d been driving a Zamboni in suburban Helsinki to pay his bills. Two years after he was signed, Antti Niemi led the Blackhawks to the championship.
This has unsettled the birthplace of hockey. In any single game, the most important player on the ice is typically the goaltender. For the past quarter century, Canadians like me have been especially smug about what seemed to be an endless supply of elite goaltenders from Quebec. Yet at the same moment that Finland’s goalies have glided so effortlessly onto hockey’s biggest stages, a crisis of confidence has begun to emerge in Canada. The last great Canadian netminder, Martin Brodeur, is in his 40s. And the pipeline behind him has gone dry.
A bunch of half-cocked theories have emerged to explain how these Finnish goaltenders came to be. People I asked would cite everything from the welfare state to the stoic national character. Then I began to hear too about Urpo Ylönen, the old man who lived on Finland’s southwestern coast. People who knew hockey and Finland spoke of him the way Jedis would talk about Yoda or Obi-Wan Kenobi. That they referred to him simply as Upi only added to the mystique. So early one foggy morning, I found myself on a train from Helsinki to Turku, a place I knew only from the back of hockey cards, hoping to meet him—and to figure out what had gone so awry back home.
Read more. [Image: Tuukka Koski]

The Oracle of Ice Hockey

In Finland not long after World War II, kids would play a street game called ice ball, which had few rules and less strategy. They’d scramble through neighborhoods buried in snow, batting and kicking a piece of cork the size of a tennis ball—graduating, eventually, if they were keen and had money for skates, to a soccer field covered with ice. But some of the more serious kids wanted to play hockey. Back then, teams weren’t especially well organized: the worst athlete was usually stuck in front of a net, while the better ones attacked. Until one day, in the early 1950s, a hockey team in Rauma put a kid called Upi, who had been a powerful skater since his ice-ball days, in the net. And his team began to win.

About 10 years later, Upi—emphasis on the oop—moved to Turku, on the southwestern coast, where he found a place in goal for one of the local hockey teams. Like Roy Hobbs, he fashioned his own stick. Turku was a port town, roughly halfway between Stockholm and the Soviet border, the gateway to a 20,000-island archipelago that extends into the Baltic Sea. Its people knew how to fish and build big ships. Few people had TVs. No book about how to be a goaltender had ever been translated into Finnish. And so nobody really knew what a goalie was supposed to do. (The first proper indoor ice-hockey rink in all of Finland wouldn’t be completed until 1965.) In this splendid isolation, a school of goaltending was born, with Upi, who today is 70, as its first practitioner and eventual guru.

Until recently, aside from a handful of Americans and Europeans, National Hockey League goalies were overwhelmingly Canadian. But at the turn of the millennium, the Finns began to arrive. In 2002, Pasi Nurminen secured a starting role in Atlanta. The next season, Miikka Kiprusoff led Calgary to the league-championship finals. And then it was as though a dam broke: Vesa Toskala, Kari Lehtonen, Niklas Bäckström, Pekka Rinne, Tuukka Rask. Before 2002, no Finnish goaltender had ever locked down a starting role in the NHL. Suddenly, a country with a population of just more than 5 million people was producing one-sixth of the league’s starting goalies, most of them true blue chips. The Finns, who have now won just about everything a goalie can win in the league, are not particularly distinguished at any other position. (One NHL general manager suggested to me that outside of goaltending, no Finnish skater would crack a list of even the top 50 Canadians.) Yet any of Finland’s three Olympic goalies could have started for Canada’s team this year. How deep is Finland’s pool of talent? In 2008, the Chicago Blackhawks signed an undrafted kid who’d only recently started playing in Finland’s top professional league—before that he’d been driving a Zamboni in suburban Helsinki to pay his bills. Two years after he was signed, Antti Niemi led the Blackhawks to the championship.

This has unsettled the birthplace of hockey. In any single game, the most important player on the ice is typically the goaltender. For the past quarter century, Canadians like me have been especially smug about what seemed to be an endless supply of elite goaltenders from Quebec. Yet at the same moment that Finland’s goalies have glided so effortlessly onto hockey’s biggest stages, a crisis of confidence has begun to emerge in Canada. The last great Canadian netminder, Martin Brodeur, is in his 40s. And the pipeline behind him has gone dry.

A bunch of half-cocked theories have emerged to explain how these Finnish goaltenders came to be. People I asked would cite everything from the welfare state to the stoic national character. Then I began to hear too about Urpo Ylönen, the old man who lived on Finland’s southwestern coast. People who knew hockey and Finland spoke of him the way Jedis would talk about Yoda or Obi-Wan Kenobi. That they referred to him simply as Upi only added to the mystique. So early one foggy morning, I found myself on a train from Helsinki to Turku, a place I knew only from the back of hockey cards, hoping to meet him—and to figure out what had gone so awry back home.

Read more. [Image: Tuukka Koski]

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