December 26, 2013
Why Some People Respond to Stress by Falling Asleep

Fight or flight, or sleep.
Read more. [Image: Carianoff/Flickr]

Why Some People Respond to Stress by Falling Asleep

Fight or flight, or sleep.

Read more. [Image: Carianoff/Flickr]

October 2, 2013
Study: Stress Linked to Dementia

Women who reported more stressors experienced more distress over the course of their lives and higher rates of dementia.
Read more. [Image: bottle_void/flickr]

Study: Stress Linked to Dementia

Women who reported more stressors experienced more distress over the course of their lives and higher rates of dementia.

Read more. [Image: bottle_void/flickr]

November 27, 2012
Are Your Facebook Friends Stressing You Out? (Yes.)

The stress comes, Marder theorizes, from the kind of personal versioning that is so common in analog life — the fact that you (probably) behave slightly differently when you’re with your mom than you do when you’re with your boss, or with your boyfriend, or with your dentist. And it comes, even more specifically, from the social nuance of that versioning behavior colliding with the blunt social platform that is The Facebook. Behaviors like swearing and drinking and smoking, the study suggests, are behaviors that you (might) do with friends — but not (probably) with your boss. And, more subtly, language that you might use with your friends — in-jokes, slang, references to Breaking Bad — probably won’t track when you’re not with your friends. The awareness of that discrepancy — Facebook’s tendency to disseminate even highly targeted social interactions — leads to stress.

Read more. [Image: Shutterstock]

Are Your Facebook Friends Stressing You Out? (Yes.)

The stress comes, Marder theorizes, from the kind of personal versioning that is so common in analog life — the fact that you (probably) behave slightly differently when you’re with your mom than you do when you’re with your boss, or with your boyfriend, or with your dentist. And it comes, even more specifically, from the social nuance of that versioning behavior colliding with the blunt social platform that is The Facebook. Behaviors like swearing and drinking and smoking, the study suggests, are behaviors that you (might) do with friends — but not (probably) with your boss. And, more subtly, language that you might use with your friends — in-jokes, slang, references to Breaking Bad — probably won’t track when you’re not with your friends. The awareness of that discrepancy — Facebook’s tendency to disseminate even highly targeted social interactions — leads to stress.

Read more. [Image: Shutterstock]

July 31, 2012
Study: A Forced Smile Can Help Decrease Stress

In an experiment that was smile-worthy in its own right, researchers used chopsticks to manipulate the facial muscles of their 169 participants into a neutral expression, a standard smile, or a Duchenne smile. In addition to the chopstick placement, some were explicitly instructed to smile. Then, they were subjected to a series of stress-inducing, multitasking activities, which they struggled to perform while continuing to hold the chopsticks in their mouths. […]
The participants who were instructed to smile recovered from the stressful activities with lower hear rates than participants who held neutral expressions, and those with genuine smiles were the most relaxed of all, with the most positive affect.
Read more. [Image: frankjuarez/Flickr]

Study: A Forced Smile Can Help Decrease Stress

In an experiment that was smile-worthy in its own right, researchers used chopsticks to manipulate the facial muscles of their 169 participants into a neutral expression, a standard smile, or a Duchenne smile. In addition to the chopstick placement, some were explicitly instructed to smile. Then, they were subjected to a series of stress-inducing, multitasking activities, which they struggled to perform while continuing to hold the chopsticks in their mouths. […]

The participants who were instructed to smile recovered from the stressful activities with lower hear rates than participants who held neutral expressions, and those with genuine smiles were the most relaxed of all, with the most positive affect.

Read more. [Image: frankjuarez/Flickr]

9:31am
  
Filed under: Health News Science Smiling Stress 
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