March 6, 2014
Will This Be the U.K.’s New Flag?

Long after the Empire’s collapse, the Union Jack remains an internationally recognized symbol of Britain. But all that could change soon. Scotland, one of the four countries that make up the United Kingdom (along with England, Northern Ireland, and Wales), will hold a referendum on independence this September. If it succeeds, Britain’s iconic flag may need a makeover.
The Flag Institute, the U.K.’s national flag charity and the largest membership-based vexillological organization in the world, recently polled its members and found that nearly 65 percent of respondents felt the Union Jack should be changed if Scotland becomes independent. And after the poll, the organization found itself flooded with suggested replacements for the flag.
Read more. [Image courtesy of the U.K. Flag Institute]

Will This Be the U.K.’s New Flag?

Long after the Empire’s collapse, the Union Jack remains an internationally recognized symbol of Britain. But all that could change soon. Scotland, one of the four countries that make up the United Kingdom (along with England, Northern Ireland, and Wales), will hold a referendum on independence this September. If it succeeds, Britain’s iconic flag may need a makeover.

The Flag Institute, the U.K.’s national flag charity and the largest membership-based vexillological organization in the world, recently polled its members and found that nearly 65 percent of respondents felt the Union Jack should be changed if Scotland becomes independent. And after the poll, the organization found itself flooded with suggested replacements for the flag.

Read more. [Image courtesy of the U.K. Flag Institute]

November 11, 2013
In Britain, an Ominous Move to Conflate Journalism with Terrorism

Conservative parliamentarian Liam Fox, Britain’s former defense secretary, is urging his country’s top prosecutor to investigate whether The Guardian and its journalists violated The Terrorism Act 2000 while handling Edward Snowden’s leaks.
He is focused on the newspaper’s decision to partner with foreign publications like The New York Times. “There have been further accusations that The Guardian passed the names of GCHQ agents to foreign journalists and bloggers. Would such activities, if true, constitute an offense under the Terrorism Act 2000 or other related legislation?” Fox asked in a letter to the director of public prosecutions, adding a question about how a prosecution might be initiated. 
These actions are ominous. 
Read more. [Image: Reuters/Suzanne Plunkett]

In Britain, an Ominous Move to Conflate Journalism with Terrorism

Conservative parliamentarian Liam Fox, Britain’s former defense secretary, is urging his country’s top prosecutor to investigate whether The Guardian and its journalists violated The Terrorism Act 2000 while handling Edward Snowden’s leaks.

He is focused on the newspaper’s decision to partner with foreign publications like The New York Times. “There have been further accusations that The Guardian passed the names of GCHQ agents to foreign journalists and bloggers. Would such activities, if true, constitute an offense under the Terrorism Act 2000 or other related legislation?” Fox asked in a letter to the director of public prosecutions, adding a question about how a prosecution might be initiated. 

These actions are ominous.

Read more. [Image: Reuters/Suzanne Plunkett]

August 30, 2013
The Vote Against War in the U.K.: No, David Cameron Hasn't Been Humiliated

August 21, 2013
The Tough British Terrorism and Media Laws Behind the Crackdown on The Guardian

One Saturday in July, British intelligence officers watched as two Guardian employees used grinders to destroy hard drives and memory chips that held documents from the U.S. and U.K. spying programs revealed by Edward Snowden. It was their only choice, the Guardian  later wrote, other than to surrender the equipment to officials.
According to Guardian editor Alan Rusbridger, the incident was foreshadowed by sinister warnings from the U.K. government, including: “You’ve had your fun. Now we want the stuff back.”
Today, Reuters reported that British Prime Minister David Cameron personally dispatched his Cabinet secretary, Jeremy Heywood, to try to stop the Guardian from publishing its Snowden stories.
Read more. [Image: Ricardo Moraes/Reuters]

The Tough British Terrorism and Media Laws Behind the Crackdown on The Guardian

One Saturday in July, British intelligence officers watched as two Guardian employees used grinders to destroy hard drives and memory chips that held documents from the U.S. and U.K. spying programs revealed by Edward Snowden. It was their only choice, the Guardian later wrote, other than to surrender the equipment to officials.

According to Guardian editor Alan Rusbridger, the incident was foreshadowed by sinister warnings from the U.K. government, including: “You’ve had your fun. Now we want the stuff back.”

Today, Reuters reported that British Prime Minister David Cameron personally dispatched his Cabinet secretary, Jeremy Heywood, to try to stop the Guardian from publishing its Snowden stories.

Read more. [Image: Ricardo Moraes/Reuters]

July 19, 2013
Poised to Crown: What Happens When a Baby Won't Come Out

4:45pm
  
Filed under: Royal Baby Health UK 
July 18, 2013
'The Royal Body Exists to Be Looked At'

6:35pm
  
Filed under: UK Kate Middleton Royal Baby 
January 11, 2013
Does Anyone Like Kate Middleton’s New Portrait?
[Image: The Duchess of Cambridge by Paul Emsley]

Does Anyone Like Kate Middleton’s New Portrait?

[Image: The Duchess of Cambridge by Paul Emsley]

August 9, 2011
inothernews:

The New York Times brings us thoughts on the London riots from Egyptian bloggers.

inothernews:

The New York Times brings us thoughts on the London riots from Egyptian bloggers.

(via pantslessprogressive)

10:26am
  
Filed under: London UK Egypt 
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