March 14, 2014
This Guy Makes Millions Playing Video Games on YouTube

The YouTube personality with the most subscribers isn’t Justin Bieber (8 million) or Rhianna (12.5 million). That honor goes to a 24-year-old Swede named Felix Kjellberg, better known by his YouTube handle, PewDiePie. 
PewDiePie doesn’t sing or dance, no. PewDiePie has made his name—and a fortune—posting videos of himself playing video games. In one November video, for instance, he plays the Xbox Indie game “Techno Kitten Adventure,” helping a feline avatar navigate dangerous terrain filled with unicorns and narwhals, and shrieking in frustration each time his cat crashes into an obstacle.
“What am I supposed to do?” he wails shortly before his grey kitten with a jetpack dies. “It doesn’t get more hardcore than this.”
In another, featuring the game “Trouble in Terrorist Town,” PewDiePie controls a military gunman who gleefully mows down other soldiers. Together, these two clips have attracted nearly 7 million views.
In his videos, PewDiePie laughs, swears, and goofs around as if he were hanging out with his best friend. But 23 million people subscribe to his YouTube channel.
PewDiePie is a Let’s Player, one of hundreds of gamers who post “Let’s Plays” online (as in “Let’s Play Super Mario Bros.” or “Let’s Play Grand Theft Auto”), videos that are part “Mystery Science Theater,” part Siskel and Ebert reviews. As a Let’s Player navigates a game, he (or more rarely, she) provides running commentary, usually funny and profane. 
Read more. [Image: Wikimedia Commons]

This Guy Makes Millions Playing Video Games on YouTube

The YouTube personality with the most subscribers isn’t Justin Bieber (8 million) or Rhianna (12.5 million). That honor goes to a 24-year-old Swede named Felix Kjellberg, better known by his YouTube handle, PewDiePie.

PewDiePie doesn’t sing or dance, no. PewDiePie has made his name—and a fortune—posting videos of himself playing video games. In one November video, for instance, he plays the Xbox Indie game “Techno Kitten Adventure,” helping a feline avatar navigate dangerous terrain filled with unicorns and narwhals, and shrieking in frustration each time his cat crashes into an obstacle.

“What am I supposed to do?” he wails shortly before his grey kitten with a jetpack dies. “It doesn’t get more hardcore than this.”

In another, featuring the game “Trouble in Terrorist Town,” PewDiePie controls a military gunman who gleefully mows down other soldiers. Together, these two clips have attracted nearly 7 million views.

In his videos, PewDiePie laughs, swears, and goofs around as if he were hanging out with his best friend. But 23 million people subscribe to his YouTube channel.

PewDiePie is a Let’s Player, one of hundreds of gamers who post “Let’s Plays” online (as in “Let’s Play Super Mario Bros.” or “Let’s Play Grand Theft Auto”), videos that are part “Mystery Science Theater,” part Siskel and Ebert reviews. As a Let’s Player navigates a game, he (or more rarely, she) provides running commentary, usually funny and profane.

Read more. [Image: Wikimedia Commons]

March 12, 2014
There’s More to Making Non-Sexist Art Than Not Being Sexist

If you don’t want to make art that’s prejudiced, then you need to take conscious, concrete steps to do so—as the game developers behind Desktop Dungeon found out.
Read more. [Image: QCF]

There’s More to Making Non-Sexist Art Than Not Being Sexist

If you don’t want to make art that’s prejudiced, then you need to take conscious, concrete steps to do so—as the game developers behind Desktop Dungeon found out.

Read more. [Image: QCF]

March 5, 2014
Casting ‘Revive’ on Final Fantasy

The 1980s were a good time for video games, a period of innovation when many of the medium’s biggest franchises were born. Mario Bros. introduced its iconic plumbing siblings to the world in 1983. In 1986 Legend of Zelda allowed gamers to adventure like never before.
Slightly less heralded but no less influential was Hironobu Sakaguchi’s role-playing game Final Fantasy, released in 1987. Over the years, the series has proved that video games can be a powerful, immersive tool for storytelling. With 14 main installments and millions of copies sold since its inception, a generation of gamers (and of game makers) has grown up with the richly detailed worlds that Sakaguchi and game design firm Square have created.
Yet in recent years, the series has lost much of its relevance. Several critics have declared the death of Final Fantasy. The release of a new game in the franchise no longer generates the fervor it once did, and the field of competitors is much stronger than it once was. But with a return to the franchise’s roots, Final Fantasy could regain its edge just when the gaming industry needs it most. And surprisingly, Lightning Returns: FFXIII, the lukewarmly received “triquel” to Final Fantasy XIII, could be the first step in turning things around.
Read more. [Image: Square Enix]

Casting ‘Revive’ on Final Fantasy

The 1980s were a good time for video games, a period of innovation when many of the medium’s biggest franchises were born. Mario Bros. introduced its iconic plumbing siblings to the world in 1983. In 1986 Legend of Zelda allowed gamers to adventure like never before.

Slightly less heralded but no less influential was Hironobu Sakaguchi’s role-playing game Final Fantasy, released in 1987. Over the years, the series has proved that video games can be a powerful, immersive tool for storytelling. With 14 main installments and millions of copies sold since its inception, a generation of gamers (and of game makers) has grown up with the richly detailed worlds that Sakaguchi and game design firm Square have created.

Yet in recent years, the series has lost much of its relevance. Several critics have declared the death of Final Fantasy. The release of a new game in the franchise no longer generates the fervor it once did, and the field of competitors is much stronger than it once was. But with a return to the franchise’s roots, Final Fantasy could regain its edge just when the gaming industry needs it most. And surprisingly, Lightning Returns: FFXIII, the lukewarmly received “triquel” to Final Fantasy XIII, could be the first step in turning things around.

Read more. [Image: Square Enix]

February 3, 2014
The Squalid Grace of Flappy Bird

January 27, 2014
Someone Wrote a Poem About The Sims' Amazing Software Updates

In The Sims, the best-selling PC game of all time,you play people’s lives. At least initially, there’s not much of a plot. Instead, there are houses and pets and people (and sometimes colleges and vacations and time travelers). You guide your guileless Sims through showering, eating, and eeking out an existence.
Wikipedia classifies it as a “strategic life simulation game,” which is possibly the best genre title ever.
As is already clear, The Sims’ verisimilitude is kind of funny. Lots of situations come up where its straightforwardness is ridiculous. One of these—as the gaming blog Kotaku pointed out last week— is that it has superb software update notes.
Read more. [Image: The Sims/EA]

Someone Wrote a Poem About The Sims' Amazing Software Updates

In The Sims, the best-selling PC game of all time,you play people’s lives. At least initially, there’s not much of a plot. Instead, there are houses and pets and people (and sometimes colleges and vacations and time travelers). You guide your guileless Sims through showering, eating, and eeking out an existence.

Wikipedia classifies it as a “strategic life simulation game,” which is possibly the best genre title ever.

As is already clear, The Sims’ verisimilitude is kind of funny. Lots of situations come up where its straightforwardness is ridiculous. One of these—as the gaming blog Kotaku pointed out last week— is that it has superb software update notes.

Read more. [Image: The Sims/EA]

January 22, 2014
Nintendo Should Make a Pokemon Game for iOS

Nintendo is a company in trouble. Last week, it warned investors to expect a massive loss for this financial year. Its share price tumbled.
The loss was no aberration. Since January 2009, Nintendo stock has lost 65 percent of its value. Things are only getting worse: At Kotaku, the writer Stephen Totilo has declared 2014 the company’s toughest year ever.
That might be the case.
I, however, have a solution that will save the company if not the world economy. It is:
Nintendo should port old Pokémon games to iOS.
Why should they do this? Because it will be great. But also: Because everyone will buy it.
Read more. [Image: Reuters]

Nintendo Should Make a Pokemon Game for iOS

Nintendo is a company in trouble. Last week, it warned investors to expect a massive loss for this financial year. Its share price tumbled.

The loss was no aberration. Since January 2009, Nintendo stock has lost 65 percent of its value. Things are only getting worse: At Kotaku, the writer Stephen Totilo has declared 2014 the company’s toughest year ever.

That might be the case.

I, however, have a solution that will save the company if not the world economy. It is:

Nintendo should port old Pokémon games to iOS.

Why should they do this? Because it will be great. But also: Because everyone will buy it.

Read more. [Image: Reuters]

December 13, 2013
6% of Americans Think Bitcoin Is an Xbox Game

December 9, 2013
Thomas Pynchon Could Have Met a Spy in the Virtual World Second Life

If you’ve read Thomas Pynchon latest novel, Bleeding Edge, and played around in the virtual world Second Life, you will come away convinced that Pynchon spent time in SL. 
And today, a new document leaked by Edward Snowden and reported by ProPublica show that spies from the nation’s intelligence apparatus also spent time in Second Life (and massively multiplayer online games like World of Warcraft).
In fact, there were so many spies “hunting around in Second Life,” the document noted, that “a ‘deconfliction” group was needed to avoid collisions.”
Second Life’s chief technology officer, Cory Ondrejka, even gave a presentation at the NSA. (He’s now the director of mobile engineering at Facebook.)
Read more. [Image: YouTube]

Thomas Pynchon Could Have Met a Spy in the Virtual World Second Life

If you’ve read Thomas Pynchon latest novel, Bleeding Edge, and played around in the virtual world Second Life, you will come away convinced that Pynchon spent time in SL

And today, a new document leaked by Edward Snowden and reported by ProPublica show that spies from the nation’s intelligence apparatus also spent time in Second Life (and massively multiplayer online games like World of Warcraft).

In fact, there were so many spies “hunting around in Second Life,” the document noted, that “a ‘deconfliction” group was needed to avoid collisions.”

Second Life’s chief technology officer, Cory Ondrejka, even gave a presentation at the NSA. (He’s now the director of mobile engineering at Facebook.)

Read more. [Image: YouTube]

November 26, 2013
This Video Game Could Revolutionize Publishing — And Reading

With its use of sound and interactivity, the Device 6 app isn’t a novel. … Right?
Read more. [Image: Simogo]

This Video Game Could Revolutionize Publishing — And Reading

With its use of sound and interactivity, the Device 6 app isn’t a novel. … Right?

Read more. [Image: Simogo]

November 21, 2013
China’s Latest Video-Game Craze

China is in a frenzy for Airplane War, a cellphone game in which players wage aircraft battles and compete against their friends for high scores. Within two hours of its release in early August, the game was reportedly downloaded 180 million times. Stories of its addictive qualities have cropped up almost as quickly. According to one such tale, two drivers pulled over on a highway, one next to the other, just so they could finish their games. Another account describes serious thumb injuries; the South China Morning Post reported that two Hangzhou women were even hospitalized.
Airplane War’s success is the latest feather in the cap of WeChat, a Chinese messaging platform that has accumulated nearly 250 million users in less than three years. By combining games like Airplane War with free text-messaging, video chatting, and photo sharing—think WhatsApp meets Skype meets Instagram—WeChat has come to rival Sina Weibo, China’s most prominent social network.
Read more. [Image: Walter Newton]

China’s Latest Video-Game Craze

China is in a frenzy for Airplane War, a cellphone game in which players wage aircraft battles and compete against their friends for high scores. Within two hours of its release in early August, the game was reportedly downloaded 180 million times. Stories of its addictive qualities have cropped up almost as quickly. According to one such tale, two drivers pulled over on a highway, one next to the other, just so they could finish their games. Another account describes serious thumb injuries; the South China Morning Post reported that two Hangzhou women were even hospitalized.

Airplane War’s success is the latest feather in the cap of WeChat, a Chinese messaging platform that has accumulated nearly 250 million users in less than three years. By combining games like Airplane War with free text-messaging, video chatting, and photo sharing—think WhatsApp meets Skype meets Instagram—WeChat has come to rival Sina Weibo, China’s most prominent social network.

Read more. [Image: Walter Newton]

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