May 12, 2014
The Mysterious Death of Entrepreneurship in America

May 12, 2014
The Importance of Criticizing Philanthropy

An aggressive—even at times an antagonistic—engagement between the public and their benefactors shouldn’t be considered a mark of incivility. It should be considered a democratic imperative.
Read more. [Image: Wikimedia Commons]

The Importance of Criticizing Philanthropy

An aggressive—even at times an antagonistic—engagement between the public and their benefactors shouldn’t be considered a mark of incivility. It should be considered a democratic imperative.

Read more. [Image: Wikimedia Commons]

May 9, 2014
What It’s Like To Work at the Walmart Obama Is Visiting Today

"All I can afford to eat for lunch is a cup of coffee and a bag of potato chips."
Read more. [Image: Reuters]

What It’s Like To Work at the Walmart Obama Is Visiting Today

"All I can afford to eat for lunch is a cup of coffee and a bag of potato chips."

Read more. [Image: Reuters]

3:45pm
  
Filed under: Work Business Walmart Labor 
May 8, 2014
Report: Journalists Are Miserable, Liberal, Over-Educated, Under-Paid, Middle-Aged Men

Today, the term ink-stained wretches is exactly one-third accurate.
Journalists aren’t quite so blotched from pens and printers, now that the newspaper die-out has wiped out 50 years of advertising gains in a decade. With cleaner shirts, less paper, and worse pay, we’re more like carpal-tunnel wretches. We’re older on average than we used to be, slightly more moral, and far more lugubrious about the future of our profession.
Here is the state of the American journalist, according to a survey from Indiana University.
Read more. [Image: Reuters]

Report: Journalists Are Miserable, Liberal, Over-Educated, Under-Paid, Middle-Aged Men

Today, the term ink-stained wretches is exactly one-third accurate.

Journalists aren’t quite so blotched from pens and printers, now that the newspaper die-out has wiped out 50 years of advertising gains in a decade. With cleaner shirts, less paper, and worse pay, we’re more like carpal-tunnel wretches. We’re older on average than we used to be, slightly more moral, and far more lugubrious about the future of our profession.

Here is the state of the American journalist, according to a survey from Indiana University.

Read more. [Image: Reuters]

May 2, 2014
Are People Becoming More Open to Female Leaders?

The thing to blame if you think people don’t like it when women are in charge is “role congruity.” It’s the theory that the most primitive parts of our brain continue to dictate our ideas about gender roles, with the man setting the rules of cave-house and forging the path to the mammoth den while the woman sticks to just nurturing things. Thus, when a woman steps into a leadership role, it’s supposed to trigger a “gender-role violation” that, consciously or not, stirs us to see her as less capable.
This phenomenon has been supported by research. One study, in 1990, found that female leaders were given more negative and less positive feedback than male leaders, even though they offered the same suggestions and arguments.
In 2003, a group of business-school students were divided into two groups: Half were told that a fictional entrepreneur’s name was Heidi; the other half that it was Howard. Though the students said that Heidi and Howard were both competent and worthy of respect, “Heidi was seen as selfish and not the type of person you would want to hire or work for.”
But that was two decades ago. Since then, women have made some, but not a lot, of strides as they scuttle across the Minefield of Success and Likability.
Read more. [Image: mac_filko/Flickr]

Are People Becoming More Open to Female Leaders?

The thing to blame if you think people don’t like it when women are in charge is “role congruity.” It’s the theory that the most primitive parts of our brain continue to dictate our ideas about gender roles, with the man setting the rules of cave-house and forging the path to the mammoth den while the woman sticks to just nurturing things. Thus, when a woman steps into a leadership role, it’s supposed to trigger a “gender-role violation” that, consciously or not, stirs us to see her as less capable.

This phenomenon has been supported by research. One study, in 1990, found that female leaders were given more negative and less positive feedback than male leaders, even though they offered the same suggestions and arguments.

In 2003, a group of business-school students were divided into two groups: Half were told that a fictional entrepreneur’s name was Heidi; the other half that it was Howard. Though the students said that Heidi and Howard were both competent and worthy of respect, “Heidi was seen as selfish and not the type of person you would want to hire or work for.”

But that was two decades ago. Since then, women have made some, but not a lot, of strides as they scuttle across the Minefield of Success and Likability.

Read more. [Image: mac_filko/Flickr]

April 29, 2014
Why Men Don’t Stand Up for Their Female Colleagues

The percent of women in executive-officer positions at Fortune 500 companies has stagnated at less than 15. As more women “lean in: and we collectively continue to fight sexism, there’s another barrier to progress that hasn’t been addressed: Many men who would like to see more women leaders are afraid to speak up about it.
In the conversation about women in leadership, male voices are noticeably absent. Of Amazon’s 100 top-selling books this week about women and business, a grand total of four were written by men, and the first one doesn’t appear until far down the list. In the media, the most vocal advocates for women are influential women, including Sheryl Sandberg, Condoleezza Rice, Arianna Huffington, Anne-Marie Slaughter, Christine Lagarde, Sallie Krawcheck, Beyoncé, and Michelle Obama. Why aren’t more men stepping up to support gender parity in the upper echelons of organizations?
Read more. [Image: MCAD Library/ Flickr]

Why Men Don’t Stand Up for Their Female Colleagues

The percent of women in executive-officer positions at Fortune 500 companies has stagnated at less than 15. As more women “lean in: and we collectively continue to fight sexism, there’s another barrier to progress that hasn’t been addressed: Many men who would like to see more women leaders are afraid to speak up about it.

In the conversation about women in leadership, male voices are noticeably absent. Of Amazon’s 100 top-selling books this week about women and business, a grand total of four were written by men, and the first one doesn’t appear until far down the list. In the media, the most vocal advocates for women are influential women, including Sheryl Sandberg, Condoleezza Rice, Arianna Huffington, Anne-Marie Slaughter, Christine Lagarde, Sallie Krawcheck, Beyoncé, and Michelle Obama. Why aren’t more men stepping up to support gender parity in the upper echelons of organizations?

Read more. [Image: MCAD Library/ Flickr]

12:25pm
  
Filed under: Work Men Women Sexism Business 
April 24, 2014
The iPad Falls Short of Expectations—But What Does That Mean?

April 18, 2014
General Mills: If You Clip This Coupon, You Can’t Sue Us

General Mills, the food mega-corporation that owns Betty Crocker, Nature Valley, and basically every sweet cereal you ate and served your kids, has a startling new legal policy making it illegal to sue the company after you:

- download or print a coupon;

- “join” an online communities (which online communities is in question, but possibly including Facebook);

- subscribe to an email newsletter;

- or redeem a promotion or participate in any “offering.”

In other words: It just became nearly impossible to get a deal on a General Mills product without forfeiting your rights to sue the company. Even if your kid with a peanut allergy eats a Fiber One bar with trace amounts of peanuts and gets sick. For this reason, the Times reports that the new terms could come under strict legal scrutiny.
This policy, known as “forced arbitration,” is becoming common among companies seeking ways to prevent users and customers from joining together and suing for millions of dollars for things like false advertising.
Read more. [Image: Wikimedia Commons]

General Mills: If You Clip This Coupon, You Can’t Sue Us

General Mills, the food mega-corporation that owns Betty Crocker, Nature Valley, and basically every sweet cereal you ate and served your kids, has a startling new legal policy making it illegal to sue the company after you:

- download or print a coupon;

- “join” an online communities (which online communities is in question, but possibly including Facebook);

- subscribe to an email newsletter;

- or redeem a promotion or participate in any “offering.”

In other words: It just became nearly impossible to get a deal on a General Mills product without forfeiting your rights to sue the company. Even if your kid with a peanut allergy eats a Fiber One bar with trace amounts of peanuts and gets sick. For this reason, the Times reports that the new terms could come under strict legal scrutiny.

This policy, known as “forced arbitration,” is becoming common among companies seeking ways to prevent users and customers from joining together and suing for millions of dollars for things like false advertising.

Read more. [Image: Wikimedia Commons]

April 17, 2014
Africa’s Tech Edge

How the continent’s many obstacles, from widespread poverty to failed states, allowed African entrepreneurs to beat the West at reinventing money for the mobile age
Read more. [Image: Mike McQuade]

Africa’s Tech Edge

How the continent’s many obstacles, from widespread poverty to failed states, allowed African entrepreneurs to beat the West at reinventing money for the mobile age

Read more. [Image: Mike McQuade]

April 16, 2014
How to Stop Wasting Time Comparison Shopping

Recently, my husband and I wanted to buy some new sheets. But how to choose? Would they lose their shape over the years? Begin to pill?
A friend pointed us to Sweethome's recent sheet review. This was no joke. These testers had examined the cotton fibers under a microscope, washed the sheets multiple times, and even given them a literal smell test to make sure they didn’t have any noxious post-factory odors. We were suitably impressed, and bought their recommended sheets without thinking about it twice.
But the experience left me curious about this magical little site. Who were these people and why were they so serious about sheets? I decided to ask Jacqui Cheng, editor-in-chief of Sweethome and its partner tech-site, Wirecutter, about the work they do and why it matters. A lightly edited transcript of our conversation follows.
Read more. [Image: Alex Farris/The Sweethome]

How to Stop Wasting Time Comparison Shopping

Recently, my husband and I wanted to buy some new sheets. But how to choose? Would they lose their shape over the years? Begin to pill?

A friend pointed us to Sweethome's recent sheet review. This was no joke. These testers had examined the cotton fibers under a microscope, washed the sheets multiple times, and even given them a literal smell test to make sure they didn’t have any noxious post-factory odors. We were suitably impressed, and bought their recommended sheets without thinking about it twice.

But the experience left me curious about this magical little site. Who were these people and why were they so serious about sheets? I decided to ask Jacqui Cheng, editor-in-chief of Sweethome and its partner tech-site, Wirecutter, about the work they do and why it matters. A lightly edited transcript of our conversation follows.

Read more. [Image: Alex Farris/The Sweethome]

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