January 16, 2013
These Crayon Colors for Adults Were Long Overdue

These Crayon Colors for Adults Were Long Overdue

2:05pm
  
Filed under: Crayon Childhood Humor Art 
August 27, 2012

theatlanticvideo:

How to Speak Toddler-ese

Dr. Harvey Karp, the subject of a profile in the September Atlantic, rose to fame as the author of The Happiest Baby on the BlockIn his sequel, The Happiest Toddler on the Block, Karp shares techniques for defusing temper tantrums. One of the most unusual is a caveman-like dialect called “toddler-ese.” In these scenes from his Happiest Toddler DVD, Karp shows parents how to talk back to their enraged young children.

A request: Can somebody loop 1:25 to 1:28?

May 9, 2012
Maurice Sendak Scared Children Because He Loved Them

"Children surviving childhood is my obsessive theme and my life’s concern," Maurice Sendak told NPR in 1993. His lush visual idiom managed to evoke the strange—and sometimes malign—intensity of real childhood, as fey, unruly protagonists sparred with adversaries (fanged monsters and imperfect parents). All his work demonstrates a strong desire, and uncanny ability, to capture the eerie vividness of youth and its crucibles. "I am trying to draw the way children feel," Sendak told The New Yorker in an early profile. His ambiguous phrasing is apt—as though “the way children feel” was both what he tried to draw, and how. […]
Sendak railed against what he perceived to be an insidiously overprotective parent culture. The evidence does suggest we adults sometimes take our good-natured desire to protect children from unpleasantness to perverse depths. I see it in the phenomenon of “helicopter parenting,” for instance—the misguided attempt to thwart all potential pitfalls through hovering omnipresence. We seek to foil internal darkness, too, by plying young people with antidepressants and anxiety medication. And we’re highly sensitive about showing children any sort of “challenging” material, even in cases when censorship verges on absurd. The new documentary Bully, which depicts the brutal realities of life in the hallway and playground, was initially deemed “too violent” for children, the very audience it portrays, and attempts to reach.
But it is this expurgated account of childhood—what he called “the great 19th-century fantasy that paints childhood as an eternally innocent paradise”—that Maurice Sendak fought tooth and claw, horn and beak. He knew that children are unavoidably beset by grief, yearning, anxiety, and rage, the same wild and turbulent emotions that seize adult human beings. “To master these forces,” Sendak said, in his 1964 Caldecott acceptance speech, “children turn to fantasy: that imagined world where disturbing emotional situations are solved to their satisfaction.”
Read more. [Image: AP]

Maurice Sendak Scared Children Because He Loved Them

"Children surviving childhood is my obsessive theme and my life’s concern," Maurice Sendak told NPR in 1993. His lush visual idiom managed to evoke the strange—and sometimes malign—intensity of real childhood, as fey, unruly protagonists sparred with adversaries (fanged monsters and imperfect parents). All his work demonstrates a strong desire, and uncanny ability, to capture the eerie vividness of youth and its crucibles. "I am trying to draw the way children feel," Sendak told The New Yorker in an early profile. His ambiguous phrasing is apt—as though “the way children feel” was both what he tried to draw, and how. […]

Sendak railed against what he perceived to be an insidiously overprotective parent culture. The evidence does suggest we adults sometimes take our good-natured desire to protect children from unpleasantness to perverse depths. I see it in the phenomenon of “helicopter parenting,” for instance—the misguided attempt to thwart all potential pitfalls through hovering omnipresence. We seek to foil internal darkness, too, by plying young people with antidepressants and anxiety medication. And we’re highly sensitive about showing children any sort of “challenging” material, even in cases when censorship verges on absurd. The new documentary Bully, which depicts the brutal realities of life in the hallway and playground, was initially deemed “too violent” for children, the very audience it portrays, and attempts to reach.

But it is this expurgated account of childhood—what he called “the great 19th-century fantasy that paints childhood as an eternally innocent paradise”—that Maurice Sendak fought tooth and claw, horn and beak. He knew that children are unavoidably beset by grief, yearning, anxiety, and rage, the same wild and turbulent emotions that seize adult human beings. “To master these forces,” Sendak said, in his 1964 Caldecott acceptance speech, “children turn to fantasy: that imagined world where disturbing emotional situations are solved to their satisfaction.”

Read more. [Image: AP]

October 11, 2011
"“The Phantom Tollbooth” is not just a manifesto for learning; it is a manifesto for the liberal arts, for a liberal education, and even for the liberal-arts college. What Milo discovers is that math and literature, Dictionopolis and Digitopolis, should assume their places not under the pentagon of Purpose and Power but under the presidency of Rhyme and Reason. Learning isn’t a set of things that we know but a world that we enter."

Norton Juster’s “The Phantom Tollbooth” at 50 : The New Yorker

This is just a really great article about a really great book.

(via ryeisenberg)

(via brooklynmutt)

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