July 8, 2013
"This may be a new perspective for its genre, but a variant of it has been amazingly common in other summer blockbusters, particularly those released this year. And its implications hit far closer to home than the events of the 19th century. You can learn a lot about a film’s values from examining the motivations of its villains, and you can learn a lot about a society—or at least what Hollywood thinks society want to hear—when it produces three mainstream movies in a few months that gives its villains the exact same motivation. Iron Man 3, White House Down, and The Lone Ranger span cinematic categories—respectively, we have a comic-book film, a political action thriller, and a Western—but each of their stories portrays war, and implicitly the War on Terror, as caused by corporations and greed."

The Lone Ranger Seals It: America’s New Favorite Villain is a Rich Guy

April 26, 2012
The Corruption Law that Scares the Bejesus Out of Corporate America

Up until this past weekend, there was a very good chance that the average New York Times business page reader had never heard of the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act. It’s the sort of law that the public ordinarily doesn’t have much reason to think about, even as it keeps corporate lawyers and c-suite executives tossing in their sleep. But thanks to the the paper’s damning investigation into Walmart’s cover-up of bribery at its Mexican subsidiary, this low-key statute is suddenly getting its turn in the spotlight.
The statute, generally referred to as the FCPA, was passed in 1977 and bans individuals and companies from bribing foreign government officials to win business or influence their decision making. Those who run afoul of the law can face large fines or prison time. For decades after it was enacted, it was barely used. But in the last five years, it has evolved from an obscure vestige of the post-Watergate era into into one of the most talked about and feared laws in America’s board rooms.
Just ask Walmart.
Read more. [Image: Reuters]

The Corruption Law that Scares the Bejesus Out of Corporate America

Up until this past weekend, there was a very good chance that the average New York Times business page reader had never heard of the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act. It’s the sort of law that the public ordinarily doesn’t have much reason to think about, even as it keeps corporate lawyers and c-suite executives tossing in their sleep. But thanks to the the paper’s damning investigation into Walmart’s cover-up of bribery at its Mexican subsidiary, this low-key statute is suddenly getting its turn in the spotlight.

The statute, generally referred to as the FCPA, was passed in 1977 and bans individuals and companies from bribing foreign government officials to win business or influence their decision making. Those who run afoul of the law can face large fines or prison time. For decades after it was enacted, it was barely used. But in the last five years, it has evolved from an obscure vestige of the post-Watergate era into into one of the most talked about and feared laws in America’s board rooms.

Just ask Walmart.

Read more. [Image: Reuters]

August 29, 2011
motherjones:

A Privately Owned Nuclear Weapons Plant? In KANSAS CITY?
Yeah, it’s happening. On an old soybean field on the edge of town.
But check out the activists who found an old-school way to fight the plan.
(Photo: James Rea)

motherjones:

A Privately Owned Nuclear Weapons Plant? In KANSAS CITY?

Yeah, it’s happening. On an old soybean field on the edge of town.

But check out the activists who found an old-school way to fight the plan.

(Photo: James Rea)

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