September 7, 2012

The Mesmerizing Beauty of Nature’s Fractals

Google Earth: source of information, source of wonder, source of art. In 2010, Paul Bourke, a research associate professor at the University of Western Australia, began using the service to capture images for his ongoing Google Earth Fractals series. Since then, he’s amassed an amazing collection of space-based photographs that are equal parts science and beauty: Each intoxicating image on the project’s website is accompanied by a KMZ file that lets users pinpoint the photos’ locations on their own Google Earth viewers, putting them in geographic as well as aesthetic context.

See more. [Images: Google Earth]

August 3, 2011
Where in the World? A Google Earth Puzzle

Looking at the world through via Google Earth offers striking images of the diversity of our planet and the impact that humans have had on it. Today’s entry is a puzzle. We’re challenging you to figure out where in the world each of the images below is taken. (You’ll find answers and links at the bottom of the entry.) North is not always up in these pictures, and, apart from a bit of contrast, they are unaltered images provided by Google and its mapping partners.

How well do you know your geography? How about your topography? Test yourself and take In Focus’s Google Earth challenge.

Where in the World? A Google Earth Puzzle

Looking at the world through via Google Earth offers striking images of the diversity of our planet and the impact that humans have had on it. Today’s entry is a puzzle. We’re challenging you to figure out where in the world each of the images below is taken. (You’ll find answers and links at the bottom of the entry.) North is not always up in these pictures, and, apart from a bit of contrast, they are unaltered images provided by Google and its mapping partners.

How well do you know your geography? How about your topography? Test yourself and take In Focus’s Google Earth challenge.

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