July 26, 2013
Letting Sharks Off the Hook

Discovery Channel’s Shark Week, usually the primary excuse for shark-related news content each year, has been upstaged.
Last week, Elliot Sudal became an overnight celebrity after spending 45 minutes wrestling a shark out of the water and onto the beach in Nantucket. Sudal’s stunt drew some criticism from activists who argue that the 200-pound sand shark he wrestled faced a reduced chance of survival after the encounter. But in the context of traditional shark-human interaction, and particularly of other shark-human contests being debated this summer, the video actually conveyed something positive: that a shark fight can be entertaining even if both parties come out alive.
Read more. [Keith Bedford/Reuters]

Letting Sharks Off the Hook

Discovery Channel’s Shark Week, usually the primary excuse for shark-related news content each year, has been upstaged.

Last week, Elliot Sudal became an overnight celebrity after spending 45 minutes wrestling a shark out of the water and onto the beach in Nantucket. Sudal’s stunt drew some criticism from activists who argue that the 200-pound sand shark he wrestled faced a reduced chance of survival after the encounter. But in the context of traditional shark-human interaction, and particularly of other shark-human contests being debated this summer, the video actually conveyed something positive: that a shark fight can be entertaining even if both parties come out alive.

Read more. [Keith Bedford/Reuters]

August 2, 2011
3rdofmay:

The art: John Singleton Copley, Watson and the Shark, 1778.
The news: It’s Shark Week!
The source: Collection of the National Gallery of Art. 
History bonus: Via the National Gallery’s website, the story behind the painting: Watson and the Shark’s exhibition at the Royal Academy in 1778 generated a sensation, partly because such a grisly subject was an absolute novelty. In 1749, fourteen-year-old Brook Watson had been attacked by a shark while swimming in Havana Harbor. Copley’s pictorial account of the traumatic ordeal shows nine seamen rushing to help the boy, while the bloody water proves he has just lost his right foot. To lend equal believability to the setting Copley, who had never visited the Caribbean, consulted maps and prints of Cuba.
The rescuers’ anxious expressions and actions reveal both concern for their thrashing companion and a growing awareness of their own peril. Time stands still as the viewer is forced to ponder Watson’s fate. Miraculously, he was saved from almost certain death and went on to become a successful British merchant and politician.
Although Copley underscored the scene’s tension and immediacy, the seemingly spontaneous poses actually were based on art historical precedents. The harpooner’s pose, for example, recalls Raphael’s altarpiece of the Archangel Michael using a spear to drive Satan out of heaven. The oil painting’s enormous acclaim ensured Copley’s appointment to the prestigious Royal Academy, and he earned a fortune selling engravings of its design.

3rdofmay:

The art: John Singleton Copley, Watson and the Shark, 1778.

The news: It’s Shark Week!

The source: Collection of the National Gallery of Art. 

History bonus: Via the National Gallery’s website, the story behind the painting: Watson and the Shark’s exhibition at the Royal Academy in 1778 generated a sensation, partly because such a grisly subject was an absolute novelty. In 1749, fourteen-year-old Brook Watson had been attacked by a shark while swimming in Havana Harbor. Copley’s pictorial account of the traumatic ordeal shows nine seamen rushing to help the boy, while the bloody water proves he has just lost his right foot. To lend equal believability to the setting Copley, who had never visited the Caribbean, consulted maps and prints of Cuba.

The rescuers’ anxious expressions and actions reveal both concern for their thrashing companion and a growing awareness of their own peril. Time stands still as the viewer is forced to ponder Watson’s fate. Miraculously, he was saved from almost certain death and went on to become a successful British merchant and politician.

Although Copley underscored the scene’s tension and immediacy, the seemingly spontaneous poses actually were based on art historical precedents. The harpooner’s pose, for example, recalls Raphael’s altarpiece of the Archangel Michael using a spear to drive Satan out of heaven. The oil painting’s enormous acclaim ensured Copley’s appointment to the prestigious Royal Academy, and he earned a fortune selling engravings of its design.

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