November 19, 2013
How Three Decades of News Coverage Has Shaped Our View of the World

Head to the homepages of major news sites today, and you’ll get the impression that the bombing near the Iranian embassy in Beirut, the early warnings about HealthCare.gov’s technical problems, and the travail’s of Toronto’s scandal-saturated mayor are among the biggest stories in the world right now.

Or are they?

Defining what’s news, as any editor will tell you, is an inherently subjective exercise, and a new set of charts by the Oxford Internet Institute’s Information Geographies blog captures more than three decades of our efforts to do so.

The map above shows locations mentioned in news coverage of events between 1979 and 2013, as compiled by the Global Database of Events, Language, and Tone (GDELT). Researchers Mark Graham and Stefano De Sabbata pored over the database and isolated 43 million events in which the primary actors were located in different places, and then plotted the results. The brighter the line in the image above, the more links there are between locations.
It’s a visual that offers some interesting insights about the countries that have dominated headlines since 1979.
Read more.

How Three Decades of News Coverage Has Shaped Our View of the World

Head to the homepages of major news sites today, and you’ll get the impression that the bombing near the Iranian embassy in Beirut, the early warnings about HealthCare.gov’s technical problems, and the travail’s of Toronto’s scandal-saturated mayor are among the biggest stories in the world right now.

Or are they?

Defining what’s news, as any editor will tell you, is an inherently subjective exercise, and a new set of charts by the Oxford Internet Institute’s Information Geographies blog captures more than three decades of our efforts to do so.

The map above shows locations mentioned in news coverage of events between 1979 and 2013, as compiled by the Global Database of Events, Language, and Tone (GDELT). Researchers Mark Graham and Stefano De Sabbata pored over the database and isolated 43 million events in which the primary actors were located in different places, and then plotted the results. The brighter the line in the image above, the more links there are between locations.

It’s a visual that offers some interesting insights about the countries that have dominated headlines since 1979.

Read more.

July 3, 2013
This is what Tahrir Square looks like today.
[Image: Amr Nabil/AP]

This is what Tahrir Square looks like today.

[Image: Amr Nabil/AP]

July 3, 2013
"Egyptian anti-sexual harassment groups confirmed that mobs sexually assaulted and in some cases raped at least 91 women in Tahrir Square, over four days of protests beginning on June 30, 2013, amid a climate of impunity."

Human Rights Watch

July 1, 2013

Egyptian protestors shine laser lights on a military helicopter flying over the presidential palace in Cairo, on June 30, 2013, as hundreds of thousands of demonstrators gather during a protest calling for the ouster of President Mohamed Morsi.

See more. [Credit: Mohamed Abd El Ghany/Reuters, Khaled Desouki/AFP/Getty Images]

March 12, 2013
Rest up for tomorrow, cardinals. No candidate received the two-thirds majority to be elected pope today.

Rest up for tomorrow, cardinals. No candidate received the two-thirds majority to be elected pope today.

2:56pm
  
Filed under: News World News Religion Vatican GIF Pope 
March 12, 2013
istherewhitesmoke.com

1:42pm
  
Filed under: News World news Vatican Pope 
February 15, 2013
"The widely-cited 60,000 and 70,000 numbers bear some kind of statistical relationship to the true death count; though at present, we have no idea what that relationship is. The numbers are a reflection of what is currently known about the conflict — and not, in fact, a reflection of the realities of the conflict. […] A misleading number is now woven into a debate of global importance. The Syria conflict’s true humanitarian scope is being unintentionally yet insidiously distorted."

A U.N. statistic severely underestimates the number of people killed in Syria. Do they have an better alternatives — and would it even matter if they did?

February 15, 2013
What It Was Like to Watch the Russian Meteorite(s) Fall

"I was driving to work, it was quite dark, but it suddenly became as bright as if it was day. I felt like I was blinded by headlights."— Viktor Prokofiev, 36, a resident of Yekaterinburg, where the meteorite hit in the Urals Mountains
"What was it? People said it was a plane that fell and exploded. I saw a bright blast from behind me. Everything was lit up, very bright light. It was like from Armageddon movie when the meteorite rain started, I really thought it was like doomsday. It was so scary especially the explosion. It was very strong. I am speechless. It was so strong. My camera couldn’t reproduce how strong the bang was.’” — Gulnara Dudka, a woman in her 20s
Read more.

Wow.

What It Was Like to Watch the Russian Meteorite(s) Fall

  • "I was driving to work, it was quite dark, but it suddenly became as bright as if it was day. I felt like I was blinded by headlights."
    Viktor Prokofiev, 36, a resident of Yekaterinburg, where the meteorite hit in the Urals Mountains

  • "What was it? People said it was a plane that fell and exploded. I saw a bright blast from behind me. Everything was lit up, very bright light. It was like from Armageddon movie when the meteorite rain started, I really thought it was like doomsday. It was so scary especially the explosion. It was very strong. I am speechless. It was so strong. My camera couldn’t reproduce how strong the bang was.’” 
    — Gulnara Dudka, a woman in her 20s

Read more.

Wow.

December 19, 2012

North Korea Thinks Kim Jong-Un Won Time’s Person of the Year

[Images: Reuters; screenshot]

12:18pm
  
Filed under: News North Korea World News 
November 29, 2012
The Internet Is Down in Syria

The Internet Is Down in Syria

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